Yahoo! Eats Del.icio.us

Posted by: Rob Hof on December 09, 2005

Heather Green at Blogspotting has the news, along with TechCrunch’s Mike Arrington: Yahoo’s buying the tagging site del.icio.us. Between the acquisitions of del.icio.us and Flickr, Yahoo clearly is embracing tagging, or social bookmarking of Web sites, in a big way. Apparently, del.icio.us will operate as is for now, though it’s hard to imagine Yahoo won’t integrate it before long—especially since it has its own tag-driven service, My Web 2.0.

Yahoo’s Jeremy Zawodny has a bit to say, though it’s all over the blogsphere now. More thoughts to come—from all of you too, I hope. What do you think?

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Reader Comments

Jim Dermitt

December 11, 2005 09:22 AM

I think it makes perfect sense to sell something such as this to a company like Yahoo. I don't know what Yahoo paid for it, but I assume it was less than what it would have cost Yahoo to develop themselves. I don't depend on social bookmarking for finding stuff, but I can see that the concept has commercial value. I guess we'll see more social bookmarking sites coming online, since the concept sells and appears to be popular with users. It seems like social bookmarking could change the search business, since people rather than algorithms determine how things are ranked.
It looks like Yahoo just bought a whole bunch of new editors. A big plus is that Yahoo won't have to pay them and they are doing a great job ranking stuff. It sounds like a good solution for Yahoo to make their service more user oriented. I think it will change the way Yahoo delivers search results, which will change the way ads appear. This is a contrast to Google, which delivers results based on crawling the web with algorithms that almost nobody can figure out. I think the Yahoo approach seems sensible. Let the user determine what's important and it will be important. Good luck.

Jim Dermitt

December 11, 2005 11:38 AM

If you don't have to spend time figuring it out, it stands to reason that more people will use it. I tend to avoid geek news sites, not because I don't like geeks but because you need to have a great deal of background information to understand the articles. These usually link to other articles which link to still more articles in order to clarify things. It's not a good way to save time. It seems like a good way to spawn ads, once they have you good and confused. If you are looking for an Xbox 360 this Christmas, all you can find are articles and ads. For some reason you can't find the actual product, which kind of seems strange. Santa has plenty of ads out there. I'll bet he can't find you an Xbox. Santa has a strong brand. So much for a Merry Xmas.

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