New Ideas in Online Advertising: Who Needs Google?

Posted by: Rob Hof on December 06, 2005

Heard a couple of new buzzwords—or are they incipient markets?—at the When 2.0 workshop presented at Stanford today by Esther Dyson’s ReLease 1.0 and Stanford’s Media X program.

* “user-generated advertisers”: That’s what Brian Dear of the online “event discovery” service EVDB (otherwise known as eventful), calls advertisers who appear like magic where people gather online (or offline for that matter). He brought up the term after Scott Heiferman of Meetup mentioned how a New York Meetup group of several hundred photographers got an offer from a camera shop to sponsor the group and offer discounts on gear. Actually, it’s not a buzzword yet—type it into Google in quotes and you get ZERO results. Not for long, I bet.

* “reality ads”: That’s one of the new online business models suggested by Munjal Shah of Riya, the fledgling photo service that can recognize faces and text in photos to help people organize their digital collections. Sites such as TripAdvisor encourage people to submit reviews, alongside which they run sponsored ads and links. Likewise, Shah envisions selling ads alongside collections of people’s vacation photos of particular hotels or resorts that they’ve uploaded for their own use. Or charging those companies for use of the photos and offering a cut to the amateur photographers for their effort. He considers these photos, like user reviews of products, much more revealing and useful than those offered by the venues themselves. “Hidden in the back of consumer pictures are all kinds of economic value,” he says.

Clearly, Google won’t be the last word in online advertising innovation.

More on the conference—including Google’s non-announcement of an online calendar service—by Dan Farber at Between the Lines.

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Reader Comments

M Britton

December 7, 2005 05:00 AM

Very edifying. As far as finding no results for "user-generated advertisers" from Google:
you get plenty if you input "user-generated advertising".

Chris Heuer

December 8, 2005 04:17 PM

This piece finally forced me to write my post on the Rise of Amateur Events, which is at the root of this evolution. More on this can be found on the BrainJams blog.

Sam

December 11, 2005 07:48 PM

The user generated advertisers may already be what kolablog is offering - give the users a piece of the action from advertisers. Check out their free cool web 2.0 multimedia blog service at: www.kolablog.com

Phil Lightman

December 16, 2005 06:27 AM

Finding no results on Google apparently prompted this site. www.Locateya.com They are here and like em or not visual advertising and directories are here to stay... . Finally a professional site with a fabulous little search engine. When this is recognised by advertisers and customers alike...move over Google!!

Evan Gallette

December 20, 2005 03:36 PM

Anyone know the best way to submit a site for free, I have already submitted to the DMOZ.ORG but directory.yahoo.com cost to much money. I am just starting up and I dont have $299 to pay them, If I did pay yahoo the money is there a chance my site would not even get a hit?
Evan

Online advertising

April 17, 2007 07:37 PM

Big multi-billion dollars corporations are now dominating the search results, leaving no room for the rest of the billions of websites.

In a couple of years, billions of these websites who are still languishing from traffic starvation will be forced to get off from online and go back to offline marketing.

Ikey

Jim P

August 10, 2008 05:59 PM

That's true about multi-billion dollar corporations dominating search results. The best bet for new websites is to find a unique marketing strategy, that's fair for everyone involved. I recently found a site called The Online Billboard (www.theonlinebillboard.com), which aims at allowing everyone the equal opportunity to get quality targeted traffic to their website (since search engines are one-sided most of the time), the site is currently pulling in 500-700 unique viewers daily, because of it's interesting & unique concept. Give it a try if you're tired of dealing with search engines.

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