Magazine

SmallBiz, Big Impact


When we launched BusinessWeek SmallBiz in 2004, we knew there was a need for aggressive coverage of small companies and entrepreneurs. The two issues we produced that year were so well received that we moved to a quarterly schedule in 2005. This year we've increased our circulation rate base from 500,000 to 650,000. And BusinessWeek itself has added a monthly feature on entrepreneurs.

Clearly, we're on to something. Reader feedback has been enthusiastic, praising SmallBiz for its focus on service and the tough reporting BusinessWeek is known for. SmallBiz, which won Best Start-Up Publication in the 2005 Jesse H. Neal Awards from American Business Media (as well as the Silver prize for New Publication from the American Society of Business Publication Editors), is up for three Neal Awards in 2006: Best Single Issue, Best News Coverage, and Best How-To Article. Kudos to Editor Kimberly Weisul, Deputy Editor Susan Price, Art Director Edith Gutierrez, Photo Editor Kathleen Moore, and Copy Chief Marc Miller.

We're not slowing down. Our spring issue, hot off the press, builds on BusinessWeek's groundbreaking reporting on innovation. The Cover Story, "Ideas That Bloom," is a guide to turning fresh ideas into competitive advantages, small-business style. Case in point: Numi Tea, a $7 million Oakland (Calif.) startup whose novel "flowering" tea delivered 26% of its holiday sales. Also in this issue: the debut of Doug Hall's "Jump Start" column, on the best thinking in innovation, and "Net Worth," in which an entrepreneur facing financial hurdles gets expert advice.

At our Web site, businessweek.com/smallbiz, you'll find small-business news updated daily, our "Smart Answers" advice column, special reports, views, tools, online courses, and resources.

If you work for a company with 300 or fewer employees and want to receive SmallBiz, e-mail bwsmallbiz_custserv@businessweek.com or write to BusinessWeek SmallBiz, P.O. Box 8425, Red Oak, Iowa 51591. There's no charge. Just provide your title, company name, and number of employees.

We think you'll find it both useful and fun. Let us know if you agree.

Joyce Barnathan, Executive Editor


Burger King's Young Buns
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW

(enter your email)
(enter up to 5 email addresses, separated by commas)

Max 250 characters

 
blog comments powered by Disqus