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August 09, 2005

comScore and Bloggers

Heather Green

What Fred Wilson said...

Amid all the flurry around comScore's "Behaviors of the Blogosphere" study, which is a good step towards understanding the state of blogs, Wilson brings some necessary skepticism, writing:

"There are some questionable stats in this report. Gizmodo over Engadget? Defamer over Boing Boing? I have my doubts about some of the blog specific data and the fact that Nick Denton was the co-sponsor of this report begs the question even more."

Anytime a report is co-sponsored by a company that may benefit, some healthy skepticism is warranted. Not cynicism, just skepticism. I don't have time to dig into the report, but that's my two cents. And again, I am with Wilson (who discloses he is an investor in comScore) in saying that more data, the better, because the more you have the more you can triangulate it and the better you can understand something as fast moving as blogs.

11:34 AM

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? Digital Journalism from The Language Artist

Jeff Jarvis, a media critic, consultant and blogger, has a must-read article in yesterday?? Guardian (Use BugMeNot to get around the annoying registration):

[M]ainstream news is under assault by scandals, declining credibility, shrinking audien... [Read More]

Tracked on August 9, 2005 05:43 PM

The comscore custom report from based on their Media Metrix panel was a wonderful edition to our understanding of blog audiences. comscore is a reputable third-party audience ratings firm, and they did a great job. But one thing I don't think the report accounted for was consumption, interaction or engagement of blog/rss content via news readers. To be sure, news readers are still niche, so the distribution of blog readers would fall predominantly outside of the readers. In other words, most blog readers are probably reading blogs as unique visitors to the actual blog Web sites - not as a feeds.

However, it is possible that a HUGE concentration of blog reading, impressions and engagement fall within the people who use readers. For example, I use my reader to scan about 50 blogs and 50 mainstream news feeds and 50 technorati and bloglines searches everyday. It would not be feasible to visit each of those individual sites one by one.

And today, I don't know of anyone who is collecting that data from an audience perspective. That's not so much a problem now, but if news readers become mainstream, that could be a huge issue...bot just for measuring blogs, but for measuring any media delivered via RSS. Undoubtedely, all of those feeds and media will become evermore fragmented, and less conducive to the traditional panel-based audience tracking approach. I could be wrong, but that's my hunch.

Disclosure: I used to be the lead marketing guy for comScore Media Metrix, and I left to do my own consulting gig and other stuff. I still have the utmost respect for them, including Graham Mudd, who worked under me years ago and authored the blog report. Congrats on the report, Graham! And good luck in business school! Oh, congrats to Rick Bruner as well.

Posted by: Max Kalehoff at August 9, 2005 03:57 PM


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