Bloomberg News

Raiders CEO Amy Trask Steps Down as NFL’s Most Powerful Woman

May 13, 2013

Former Oakland Raiders CEO Amy Trask

A file photo shows former Oakland Raiders LP Chief Executive Officer Amy Trask with fans before a game against the Tennessee Titans in Oakland, California during September 2002. Photographer: Peter Read Miller/Sports Illustrated via Getty Images

Amy Trask, once called the most powerful woman in the National Football League, stepped down as chief executive officer of the Oakland Raiders.

Trask said two days ago that she’s leaving after 25 seasons now that the transition from late owner Al Davis, who died in October 2011, to his son, Mark, is complete.

“Having honored a commitment that I made to effectuate a smooth transition and transfer of control, I no longer wish to remain with the organization,” Trask said in an e-mail. “For over a quarter of a century, it was my honor and my privilege to work for the Raiders. I will forever appreciate the opportunity afforded me by Al Davis.”

Since interning for the franchise during law school, she had spent all but 20 months working for the team.

“People perceive me as a business person who works in the business of football,” Trask said in an interview with Bloomberg in December 2010 at Raiders headquarters. “I perceive myself as a football person who, because of gender or size, finds myself making my contribution in the business side of things. Football was what I wanted to do, business was my way of making it happen.”

Trask was promoted to chief executive in 1997 by Al Davis, who put her in charge of everything from sponsorships to TV contracts to representing the club at league meetings. Sports Illustrated called her “the most powerful woman in the NFL.”

Her only career experience outside the Raiders was 20 months at law firm Barger & Wolen LLP in 1985-87 in Los Angeles.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nancy Kercheval in Washington at nkercheval@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net


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