Jack Nicholson talks up hydrogen power, circa 1978

Posted by: Adam Aston on September 2, 2008

A brief reminder of how long the vision of a clean, hydrogen automotive fleet has been lumbering along. Try not to be distracted by the narrator’s pronunciation of cahr.

Reader Comments

Jonathan chelseagreen.com

September 3, 2008 9:58 AM

As with electric cars, a hydrogen automotive fleet is only clean if the hydrogen (or electricity) is produced from clean sources. Hydrogen is not an energy source, it is a storage medium--basically a liquid battery. If you use coal-fired power plants to produce the electricity needed to liberate hydrogen from water, then the hydrogen comes with a dirty footprint. Sure, you might have some local pollution gains in the cities, by eliminating tailpipe emissions of pollutants. But then you increase the pollutants coming from the electric plants. In the big picture, are you reducing overall fossil fuel consumption? Are you reducing greenhouse gas emissions? That is by no means a certainty. Let's keep our eyes on the prize: zero emissions throughout the system, not merely at the point of final use.

RoadSharing.com

September 5, 2008 10:58 AM

Newcomer to the social travel scene, RoadSharing.com aims to make a difference, specifically an environmental one. This site is concerned with your carbon footprint, which as you probably know by now is greatly augmented when you travel in your gas guzzling car. One way to curb your carbon emissions is to car pool or to bring some people along with you on your next roadtrip. RoadSharing connects people who need a ride with those who’ve got a ride; thus people can get to where they need to be and make new friends on the way. The site is divided into two basic options: Search a route and Share a route. The latter is for those looking to drive people to a certain destination, while the former, is for those looking for a lift. The site is available in several languages including Italian and Spanish. Sign up is free.

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BusinessWeek correspondents John Carey and Mark Scott, cover the green scene, keeping on top of the business aspects of energy, the environment and climate change, as well as the technologies, policies, markets and people that are shaping how the earth's resources will be used in the century ahead.

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