What do you want from T-Mobile? Deutsche Telekom's head of innovation and product development answers your questions

Posted by: Helen Walters on October 6, 2008

Hamid Akhavan, head of mobile communications, innovation and product development for Deutsche Telekom — and the man in charge of T-Mobile International for most of Europe — is coming to BusinessWeek Towers tomorrow. I’ll be filming a brief video interview with him and then talking to him about plans for the future, including the company’s hopes for its experiments with Android. We recently published an op ed piece by Adaptive Path mobile design strategist, Rachel Hinman on what she thinks T-Mobile should do to position itself as the perfect mobile carrier of the 21st century, and I’ll be putting some of her points to Akhavan directly. But what do you want to know of T-Mobile’s plans for the future? Let me know and I’ll put your questions to him, too.

Reader Comments

Adam

October 6, 2008 4:30 PM

I have a simple question for T-Mobile (and BTW, I am a customer):

When will your product (i.e., cellphone service) work? I don't mean when will it mostly work. I don't mean when will it usually work. I don't mean when will it drop the fewest calls. I mean when will it work. Phones need to just work. Like the water faucet. You turn it on. Clean water comes out. It needs to be that simple.

Stefan

October 7, 2008 3:47 PM

What a sad question, what a simple mind ...
Issues for Akhavan are rather:
Start to capitalize on assets that you have: e.g. deal with Greek OTE group: assume leadership and move forward!

Paul

October 7, 2008 5:19 PM

Mobile Broadband has really changed my T-Mobile experience, but I regularly get frustrated by the fact that the service is still not comparative to regular Broadband despite the HSDPA modem. I would like a truly mobile equivalent, able to download web pages without (excuse me) crappy image compression and pathetic pauses in streamed media, not to mention the inability to use VoIP services as a result of the poor connection speed - which in honesty would not be as bad if I were able to receive a call whilst online.

Also, rates are still significantly different and although I appreciate the overhead the limits simply do not justify the price tag.

So my first question:
- When will mobile broadband really be a serious contender to wired/wireless equivalents?

NEXT:
Despite EU legislation for EU roaming these charges are still significantly more expensive than home calls despite the network to which I connect.

Second question:
When will I be able to roam onto another T-Mobile network and carry with me the call benefits I experience at home (ie. inclusive minutes, data availability etc)

Helen Walters

October 13, 2008 2:53 PM

Thanks so much for the questions and the suggestions. A couple came in after Akhavan had already been and gone, but there's much food for thought here. I'll post the video and story when we have them. Meantime, thanks again for taking the time to write. Helen

Joseph E Morrissette

January 21, 2009 2:16 PM

I suggest Akhavan takes a look of the record of T-mobile US through the Better Business Bureau complaints and deal with his organizations inability to deal with even simple tasks.

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