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TRACKING THE TROOPS IN CYBERSPACE

CONVINCED THAT YOUR company needed access to the Internet, you've spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on equipment, personnel, and training. But how are employees really using the company's Internet connections? To help managers of corporate information systems study this issue, Sequel Technology Corp. in Bellevue, Wash., offers its Net Access Manager.

Sequel's software runs on the corporate network server and monitors activity over the company's intranet and links to the Internet. The program can keep track of which Web sites are requested most often, when data traffic across the company's links is the most congested, what kind of files are being downloaded and passed around the intranet, as well as other vital information. While the software can link specific activity to individual employees, spying on employees is not the point, say Sequel executives. By giving managers the tools to track corporate Net activity, execs can make better decisions about their Internet strategies and ''acceptable use'' policies. Reports generated by Net Access Manager might show, for example, that Net traffic is highest at noon because employees are jamming the network with tons of E-mail. So instead of spending more money on another access line, managers could institute an E-mail ban during lunch or just reprogram the server to send E-mail at different times.

EDITED BY PAUL M. ENG


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Updated June 15, 1997 by bwwebmaster
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