Apple May Not Need Macworld, But Many Apple Partners May

Posted by: Peter Burrows on December 17, 2008

So posits a reader that goes by the name MacUser. He points out that:

While Apple is able to host their own events very successfully, I feel that Macworld is really the opportunity for those third Party developers to really show their wares. This eco system of third party developers is part of what makes a Mac so great. I have to believe that this will hurt third party developers and eventually hurt the Mac user’s experience. If their is no headliner Keynote, how many people and big time developers will show up. This is not the same as Apple pulling out of NAB or other trade shows where Apple is just one other big company, this is Macworld, there is no Macworld with out Apple.

It’s a good point. Apple understandably would like to be rid of the need to develop its products on Macworld’s timetable, but lesser companies need the exposure. Sure, the fast-declining role of trade shows generally means this is less true than it was. But at the least, having Apple hold onlyh its own events will give the company even more of a chokehold over which of its partners—particularly ISVs—to promote. Take the 10,000 plus apps now in the App Store, for example. At MacWorld, a small ISV might have a chance to drum up some business on the show floor to the throngs of Jobs-watchers. Now, the only hope is that Jobs will mention their app during one of Apple’s own presentation.

What do you think: Is Apple being self-centered or even short-sighted in its decision to neuter Macworld’s usefulness to the larger Apple ecosystem? Or is it being smart to put a fork in the most famous Apple-related tradeshow, and should ISVs follow its lead and stop investing in tradeshows, as well?

Reader Comments

PostHaste

December 18, 2008 4:08 AM

Apple is preparing for a post Steve Jobs world. It has no other choice. More changes are on the way.

James French

December 18, 2008 4:09 AM

Jobs is a jerk. The last thing he cares about is anyone other than Steve Jobs.

Mike

December 18, 2008 4:20 AM

Pulling out of MacWorld for Apple is a smart move. Doing so will allow Apple to focus greater time and energy on to their existing product lines and rids them of arbitrary product time lines, which tends to hinder the quality of a products debut.

barry smart

December 18, 2008 4:25 AM

Letting go of the incredible number of typos, incorrect spelling and grammar (doesn't anyone proof read the articles?)..........
Apple made a good business decision to forego trade shows, nothing more. Mac fans created a situation whereby Apple had to release a new hit product and Mr. Jobs had to perform for an audience or otherwise be hit with bad reviews from so-called Wall Street analysts that might drive the stock price into the pits. To make matters worse, caving in to the trade show baron's schedule meant releasing products at the worst possible time of the marketing year.

We're talking about a company with billions of dollars in cash (and growing) and no debt and the ability to run their own marketing events to showcase new product when the product is ready, on their terms. It's called control. It's the right business model. The Wall Street talking heads are wrong again. THAT is something that should by now surprise no one, considering the mess they're put us in.

barry smart

December 18, 2008 4:26 AM

Letting go of the incredible number of typos, incorrect spelling and grammar (doesn't anyone proof read the articles?)..........
Apple made a good business decision to forego trade shows, nothing more. Mac fans created a situation whereby Apple had to release a new hit product and Mr. Jobs had to perform for an audience or otherwise be hit with bad reviews from so-called Wall Street analysts that might drive the stock price into the pits. To make matters worse, caving in to the trade show baron's schedule meant releasing products at the worst possible time of the marketing year.

We're talking about a company with billions of dollars in cash (and growing) and no debt and the ability to run their own marketing events to showcase new product when the product is ready, on their terms. It's called control. It's the right business model. The Wall Street talking heads are wrong again. THAT is something that should by now surprise no one, considering the mess they're put us in.

Joe Miller

December 18, 2008 4:48 AM

As a CEO of a first tier subcontractor in the Aerospace sector 20+ years ago I can tell you that even then CEOs were beginning to question the efficacy of trade shows. Preparing for trade shows became almost a profession of its own in some corporations. Even some of the prime contractors began to cut back on their presence at these shows all over the world.

However, it does surprise me to read that Apple is pulling out of MacWorld. It is especially surprising that Apple did not advise the "Apple ecosystem," as you put it, the reasons behind its decision.

david Casto

December 18, 2008 4:59 AM

I do think this decision is shortsighted. In the days when the Mac was a fringe product, the product and company had fans and followers who were evangelists for the brand the product and even the company.. Apple developed loyalty that most brands can only dream of achieving. Macworld is that key event that strengthened that bond between corporation and consumer... it seemed to elevate those in attendance and who followed to more than just a consumer, but to the people that Apple was developing for and seemed to show that Apple appreciated that loyalty.

Even if Jobs can't attend every time, it would seem short sighted to not appreciate the importance this event has played in the advancement of brand and market share.

Per Sjofors

December 18, 2008 6:53 AM

Trade shows (like MacWorld or NAB) are a dying breed and are good for two purposes only (1) help a vendor to build a brand (2) networking and partnering among vendors.

The amount of real business taking place at a trade show is very small, and vendors have many better ways to reach their potential customers.

For Apple's eco system specifically, there is the developer's conference that provides the networking opportunity among vendors.

Sergey Thizgshov

December 18, 2008 7:22 AM

I happy!

Ted Garity

December 18, 2008 7:25 AM

Apple can do their WWDC so much better than macworld that it isn't even funny. To be honest, I never saw much value in macworld except for the keynote and parties. If I can only go to one trade show a year it would certainly be wwdc.

rattyuk

December 18, 2008 7:27 AM

The problem with Macworld was that Apple's big announcements drowned out most of the stuff that was launched at the show anyway. So the exposure thing was a bit of a double edged sword.

Murray

December 18, 2008 8:04 AM

Steve Jobs and Apple Corp. have, for years, denied cloning of Macs for fear of diluting the product. They did so only when market share dropped to a stagnant level. This included the market for applications and software.

Now Apple wants to do away with MacWorld. Bad business decision. Mac users are few but fiercely loyal. I'm one of them.

If Mr Jobs cares about brand loyalty, he wouldn't be abandoning MacWorld.

Jamie

December 18, 2008 9:01 AM

Of course Apple is being self-centered, but why is that a surprise? This is Classic Jobs; it's why Apple has been second fiddle to Microsoft on the world market for so long, superstar products and an ethusiastic fan base aside. (Linux has the latter as well.)

For all of his talk about Microsoft's stranglehold on the tech world, Jobs doesn't LIKE third-party developers. He doesn't LIKE innovation (unless it comes from his own company). Jobs wants a world where Apple products come from Apple and are supported by Apple.

If you like Apple, you're down with that. And if you're not, then you threw in your hat with Google when the G1 debuted and don't care about the iPhone.

brent

December 18, 2008 9:04 AM

I am not a mac user but seems to me that the point of having macworld is macs. If the flagship name of the event is no longer there, what's the point?
Other developers are not going to get the exposure they need to continue developing. And thats never a good thing!

Mike

December 18, 2008 9:19 AM

I agree with the comments so far. I'm a longtime and loyal Mac user (going back to Mac Plus) days... There might be some good business reasons for Apple to pull out of MacWorld, but I think it's a mistake and will hurt third party developers. MacUser is correct. The third party players are a big reason why the Mac is so great in its many incarnations. I own a MacBook and iPhone currently...and I think the wares available for both products from a range of companies is excellent. I wouldn't want to see innovation stifled by this move.

JePe

December 18, 2008 9:20 AM

Macworld is not cancelled. Apple won't be attending the trade show anymore is all.

Scott

December 18, 2008 9:34 AM

"Is Apple being self-centered?" When ISN'T Apple being self-centered? That's their business model.

Chad

December 18, 2008 9:35 AM

I agree -- what attracts me to Macs is the operating system and the thoughtfulness of the interface. What KEEPS me on a Mac is the apps I need and want for work and play. Some of the most useful apps for me are the little ones that I find by word of mouth. These little apps take time and effort to build and if there is no clear venue to peddle your wares you're soon going to switch to other platforms where you know you can get business. The Apple web page is NOT a good venue to sell to new software to me -- it's getting so crowded I don't have time to sift the wheat from the chaff. So I rely on word of mouth and reviews, both of which benefit from open venues like MacWorld.

Robert G

December 18, 2008 9:36 AM

I have never, in the 20 years of business, been allowed or allowed myself to attend a conference based on who was speaking. The point of any business conference is to allow the gatherers to exchange information in a meaningful way that results in increased economic value to the firms those individuals represent. In other words, if it delivers value, attend; if it does not, don't attend.

If MacWorld cannot stand on its own and deliver value to its vendors and attendees, then that's the fault of MacWorld, not Apple. Apple has no obligation to support ANY trade show. If Apple can reach and bring together customers and supporters more efficiently and cheaply without MacWorld, then they are certainly obligated to try. The burden is on MacWorld to demonstrate it worth to Apple if they want the Apple CEO to attend any future conference.

John Tenny

December 18, 2008 9:48 AM

I'm a small software developer who exhibits at conferences and have attended MacWorld. I've not exhibited at MW because the cost is excessive and the likelihood of being 'discovered' is very small. MacWorld is a venue for the major players; small vendors can do better at conferences targeted at your customer base and/or the internet. In general, the cost of exhibiting at conferences is shooting up and the attendance is dropping. My perspective is that the days of the big conference are over.
Peace, John
eCOVE Software

Jose Onate

December 18, 2008 9:49 AM

I don't understand why the industry captain has to pay a ticket to go to its own show. If "Mac" is tired of having to pay to get the spotlight at "Mac"-World, I say: 'bout time.

The same goes for Adobe and other large attractions that have to cover their own fees and also pay the ticket price. Perhaps MacWorld should start inviting these large prominent leaders instead of trying to run the show off of them.

I don't think Apple is trying to sabotage trade shows, I think they are tired of lending their celebrity for someone else's gain. It is time to start MacPlanet, organized by Apple, and the show will go on.

meanguy

December 18, 2008 9:58 AM

Most third-parties would be better off spending their time focusing on making their products better.

Who really walks through that horrible, loud bazaar at a tradeshow and discovers something cool from a cool, new small company? And if you do, you can't even buy it. Brilliant!

If it's cool, it'll get spread around in video or news form. Preferably with a link to a store where you can, shocker, actually obtain the product.

Tradeshows were always iffy from a ROI perspective to me. Let 'em die.

Mike Tan

December 18, 2008 10:02 AM

I think Macworld should continue, this will give everybody a chance to showcase what they got, and at the same time, provide Mac enthusiast like me an opportunity to have a first glimpse of what new items Mac will be offering.

Applekid

December 18, 2008 10:09 AM

I think they might be a little short-sighted in doing this. They should support those developers, and not jump ship just because they know their company can make it. Then again, they've always been way ahead of the times, and maybe once again they just did what other companies are thinking about just a year or so before trade shows go extinct. You have to admit there usually ahead of the curve.

Jimbo

December 18, 2008 10:13 AM

I think Mr. Jobs has become too focused on what he needs, and too little focused on what his customers need. First he alienated Apple's core high-end graphics users with late notebook introductions having highly-reflective screens that are poorly suited to graphics work. Now he's alienating Apple's partners by withdrawing support for one of the main outlets those companies have for showcasing their wares to the Mac Faithful.

That may simplify life for Apple in the short run. But it may also hinder Apple's growth and viability in the long run.

Del

December 18, 2008 10:14 AM

I think it's a bad call to end MacWorld. Regardless of their own inflated self-image they need to realize that ISVs and other partners who might fail due to lack of marketing will ultimately affect their own sales.
No one company can do it all (though I'm sure they'd like to) and the community of developers who have grown up because of the Mac world are vital to the community of users; indeed to Apple itself.

Craig Miller, Las Vegas

December 18, 2008 10:15 AM

Great! My company serves the trade show and the American Auto Industries.

I better pack it in.

Our CES income this year will be less than a quarter of normal. Yesterday our biggest event in Paris died when our client decided not to attend Intermatt this year. I don't have to tell you about our GM and Chrysler business at SEMA this year.

These decisions have a huge ripple effect.

The sky is falling.

digimikek

December 18, 2008 10:23 AM

every third party developer in the world has the same access to the internet that apple does; word spread cheaply and quickly when you have something somebody wants.

rustyiron

December 18, 2008 10:24 AM

The only thing that the public knows about Macworld Expo is that which Steve Jobs mentions in his keynote speech. Everything else is a mystery and will not be missed.

Ron Kent

December 18, 2008 10:24 AM

Both, self-centered and short-sighted. In today's financial climate, they need all the help they can get. And if that means doing 1 MW a year, so be it.

John

December 18, 2008 10:26 AM

In my opinion, it's just an example of Apple keeping a tight fisted control on their product. I understand that businesses operate in their own benefit, but how often can they spurn their partners, developers and community before people begin to get really frustrated? Apple has done very well for themselves. In my opinion, if the courted 3rd party businesses and developers with open arms it would help their cause even more. Unfortunately, they very reluctantly give as little as possible to keep frustrations just below the boiling point.

Of course, I don't have most successful marketing campaign in the modern era... so what do I know? :)

Ken B

December 18, 2008 10:26 AM

Apple has a history of treating its partners and retailers poorly, and its trends along many fronts are toward self-involvement and insularity. If the Mac had been introduced now, you wonder if they'd even allow 3rd-party development for it, or at least put many restrictions on it ala the iPhone.

R Barnes

December 18, 2008 10:27 AM

MacWorld - for many many people has become row after row of people selling "discount" books and software to thousands of tire kickers who resemble carnival gawkers. The days of incredible breakthrough products being introduced on the show floor have past. More of the same, more printers, more spreadsheet beginners, more monitors, hard drives and wrist pad hawkers. No "small developer" can afford to show at MacWorld. It is the attendees who follow the course paths of "sessions" who are the main people to lose out with the passing of MacWorld. Great speakers on arcane topics - stuff you don't find in an Apple store. That's the loss.

The stores really do a better job of showing good products in a 'refined" space than the loud yelling over the crowd of a Macworld booth. Goodbye - we loved you when you were the only game in town. Now you're just a drain on the wallet. Wouldn't you like to see great demos and intro's from Apple by OTHERS while Steve Jobs is still alive and influencing development? It's got to continue being a savvy company. 30,000 employees can't all be depending on the "presence" of one Mr. Jobs every single time a product is released. It's a fake - it's not really his creation - it's the team behind him and they deserve exposure - or their products do. So take the burden off Mr. Jobs and spread the joy. Keep moving Apple "up" not lateral in evolution. Your mileage may vary. But after 10 Mac Worlds in 20 years - I can honestly say - enough. Thank you.

R Barnes

December 18, 2008 10:27 AM

MacWorld - for many many people has become row after row of people selling "discount" books and software to thousands of tire kickers who resemble carnival gawkers. The days of incredible breakthrough products being introduced on the show floor have past. More of the same, more printers, more spreadsheet beginners, more monitors, hard drives and wrist pad hawkers. No "small developer" can afford to show at MacWorld. It is the attendees who follow the course paths of "sessions" who are the main people to lose out with the passing of MacWorld. Great speakers on arcane topics - stuff you don't find in an Apple store. That's the loss.

The stores really do a better job of showing good products in a 'refined" space than the loud yelling over the crowd of a Macworld booth. Goodbye - we loved you when you were the only game in town. Now you're just a drain on the wallet. Wouldn't you like to see great demos and intro's from Apple by OTHERS while Steve Jobs is still alive and influencing development? It's got to continue being a savvy company. 30,000 employees can't all be depending on the "presence" of one Mr. Jobs every single time a product is released. It's a fake - it's not really his creation - it's the team behind him and they deserve exposure - or their products do. So take the burden off Mr. Jobs and spread the joy. Keep moving Apple "up" not lateral in evolution. Your mileage may vary. But after 10 Mac Worlds in 20 years - I can honestly say - enough. Thank you.

C. J.

December 18, 2008 10:31 AM

Overall, it was a very astute business move for Apple to pull out of Macworld. They will continue to announce great products. It's just that the audience at the events may be more limited than at Macworld. But they will no longer be forced to make the announcements on someone else's schedule. And just how much sense does announcing new products in January make anyway?

The Apple "ecosystem" should care that the innovative products keep coming, not whether they can pay the big bucks to get an in-person look at S.J. once a year.

JOHN LONGENECKER

December 18, 2008 10:36 AM

December 18, 2008

Makes sense to me.
Apple at Macworld would help promote Mac related companies.

JOHN LONGENECKER
Picture America

Another MacUser

December 18, 2008 10:42 AM

It's been years since there was a decent MacWorld Expo. Apple doesn't show up at most of them. Sometimes Adobe doesn't either. So we're left with Quark (again), HP (again), Microsoft (who let THEM in?), and small developers who have paid big bucks - for what?

If Apple were truly serious about expanding their reach, they'd support IDG's MacWorld Expo, get the big players in, encourage ISVs to display their wares, and make the show worthwhile by continuing to tell the world they DON'T have to live with Windoze.

Roby Sherman

December 18, 2008 10:42 AM

As a developer I've always used trade shows like MacWorld as an opportunity to network with potential distributors (there's nothing like a hand's on demo with the vendor within their own booth) or development partners. With this avenue being gone, I suppose there's still WWDC, but I have to admit that I will miss loosing this opportunity.

Hal Smith

December 18, 2008 10:46 AM

As a professional in the graphics/marketing industry, MAC is the system that set the benchmark. They have always been known as the innovators and I think that they under estimate the true marketing power of Macworld. It's the tech world's version of Woodstock. The beauty here is that Apple and ONLY Apple can stage this annually and excite both the die hards and developers. This isn't just another trade show, it's an event that's personal--like seeing a family member once a year! In my opinion, instead of pulling out, I would expand
or fine tune the event. In a marketing sense, this is a rare
gem that all chase after, but few attain.

Linus Torvolds

December 18, 2008 10:47 AM

You have to ask if Apple is being self centered?
Steve Jobs is the epitome of egocentric behaviour.

John Lee

December 18, 2008 10:49 AM

Tradeshows had their use, but they can't offer anything to today's business or consumer apart from the opportunity to gather. Online real-time demos, downloadable demos, forums, and even Google have supplanted the need for the tradeshow. Training sessions are held around the world on major products such as Everything in Adobe's CS4 arsenal, FinalCut Pro, and other staples of the tradeshow seminar. Some of these are even held for free, alleviating the need for the tradeshow ticket "upgrade" for certain session tracks.

Furthermore, tradeshows are a huge waste of resources. Time, money, energy... just about anything you want to measure will fall on the "waste" side of the equation. How many millions (billions?) or man-hours have been lost by tradeshow vendors and attendees alike? How much energy does it take to heat up those old convention centers each winter, or to cool them in summer? How much jet fuel is required to move that many people to the convention city?

No more tradeshows for this old hand. I've done my time with them, and was happy to have them available. Nowadays, let's be smarter about how we interest people in our products an how we find our next set of customers.

Drew

December 18, 2008 10:55 AM

Of course they are being selfish... this is Apple we are talking about here. While they have a great track record of innovation and design, they don't have a good record of serving their users needs/wants/desires or those of their development community with any level of regard or respect... having worked for a big Apple ISV (one who helped legitimize Apple as the viable platform for creative pros) I have directly experienced the chilly and arrogant way that Apple treats/manages its developer community. They are quite sure they know better than anybody else (and that users are stupid). People claim that Microsoft is the evil empire... maybe that was true once upon a time... but now Apple is no better, and in some ways is worse. Effectively killing Macworld by no longer attending, they not only are sinking "the" annual Apple platform event for users they are also killing the one time that most of their ISVs can make a big marketing splash to that audience. Its just more evidence that Apple does not care about anybody but Apple (and that includes their users). I like my Mac... but people are noticing that the Kool-aid is tasting a bit funny these days.

james

December 18, 2008 11:00 AM

Apple always has been the big baby when it comes to anything about them.

John Patrick

December 18, 2008 11:13 AM

It was only a matter of time before MacWorld was "Steve Jobbed" like oh so many early adopters of Apple products.

Rob Oakes

December 18, 2008 11:16 AM

I think Apple is being self centered and short sighted and while they have always been arrogant, now they are acting conceited. MacUser is correct, part of what makes the Mac an excellent platform are the "other" programs which are available.

By taking an action that will ultimately hurt those partners, Apple is alienating its pool of developers. That is not a wise thing to do. The Mac is a small user community and developing for the Mac requires knowledge of a language (Objective C) that is not commonly used on other platforms.

Amongst my developer friends who develop for the Mac, there was already a great deal of frustration due to the manner which Apple polices (rather inefectually) the iPhone App Store. I can only imagine that this decision will further strain the relationship.

Andy Lee Garcia

December 18, 2008 11:18 AM

I think they should move it remote. YouTube just held it's first awards and millions were able to attend. If the true concern of MacWorld is to introduce the world to new Mac apps, then open it to the world. Host the site as if it were a trade show (do not offer virtual booths or 3D worlds those are tacky). Simple provide an agenda and then host Webinars for each event. You can even charge for attendance. Granted you don't get the excitement of running through an airport and hauling luggage to your hotel room, but the event would allow for more attendees. People that just don't have the time to fly out Mac World, would now attend from the comfort of their own home. If you want networking options or human interaction provide a VOIP module and allow the attendees to speak to the presenters.

Michael

December 18, 2008 11:19 AM


My arm chair observation is that given the product roadmap, release dates etc. Apple does not want to subject itself to Share price mayhem based on what they present at Mac World. Its low sharholder risk to drop out of Mac World, based on the potential Share Price hit of not making a major product anouncment at Mac World. Its a shame that it has come to this... based on instataneous fear and no long term vision...

Chris Newell

December 18, 2008 11:22 AM

My company, Musitek, develops music software for both Windows and Mac. During the 90's, we attended all sorts of computer trade shows; COMDEX and MacWorld (and Windows World) among them. At that time, trade shows were the only way to get broad visibility. COMDEX and Windows World died in 2000, MacWorld New York disappeared shortly after that. While we are still exhibiting at MacWorld 2008, this will be our last. In the last few years, the show became an excuse to stay in the City, enjoy some great downtown restaurants and go to corporate parties. Marketing-wise, it had become a wash, or worse. Our visibility is found on the Net, not on the floor pitching show specials. Apple's decision is sound.

James Weil

December 18, 2008 11:22 AM

I am of the belief that Apple decision to pull out of MacWorld will result in a long term negative impact on the companies product development and profits. Macworld not only gives it customers an opportunity to explore Apple related products but gives Apple and its 3rd party vendors an opportunity to interact with its customer base as well as giving Apple employees an opportunity to interact with their 3rd party vendors and get a feeling of how their work is being utilized. By attending Macworld and staffing their booth, Apple gives its regular employees, the ones that actually do the daily work, an opportunity to interact with customers, solicit their ideas, and learn what they like, what they want, and what issues they have with both product and support. Such feedback sparks creativity, innovation, solutions within the structure of the organization itself, and leads to better product that meet or exceed the customers needs.

Without this feedback, ideas and creativity generally only filter down from the top, with the only creativity from the typical employee being how the idea is implemented or coded. As such a valuable resource for innovation is eliminated - the customer feedback from their own staff.

The effect of this cannot be measured on a spreadsheet and surveys and studies, while somewhat valuable, simple can not replace the open dialog that occurs between Apple employees, and its customers.

While such shows are expensive, I suspect the cost is miniscule when compared to the compensation provided to Apple's executive management staff or the cost of operating the corporate aircraft.

While Apple may feel that their retail store presence may be a viable substitute for Macworld participation, I feel it simply does not offer the advantages of direct employee interaction with their customers. Apple retail is a separate division of Apple. The employees that actually work with its customers are shielded from the main company by many layers of hierarchy from the employees that are responsible for creativity, innovation, and development.

As such any ideas at the retail level have to make there way up to the top and then be filtered down to those that do the daily work. Such feedback simply cannot replace or substitute for the one on one dialog that has occurred between users and Apple employees at Macworld.

This is why I fear that Apple's decision to withdraw from Macworld participation will ultimately lead to less creativity and innovation from the company, and frustrated customers who feel that their concerns and ideas are not being addressed and no longer have a venue in which to express them. This can only have a negative impact on Apple's long term profitability and presence in the marketplace.

Good Point

December 18, 2008 11:37 AM

Apple May Not Need Macworld, But Many Apple Partners May.

I don't think Apples cares about these partners, or needs to care about them.

Welll

December 18, 2008 12:55 PM

I agree that Trade shows are a done deal for the digital age and will continue for cars RVs, Cars, boats, etc.

I went to MacWorld SF in 2006 and aside from show coupons from known vendors, I found little utility other than flirting with booth bunnies and having drinks at some after party. There was nothing there that introduced me to anything that made me say "I'll buy that".

The most affected will be bloggers in this decision. And who needs another jabbering "hip-to-be-square" blog hijacking Engadget, Gizmodo, and Wired?

Michael

December 18, 2008 5:17 PM

The only part of Apple's ecosystem that is not well represented in a trade show other than MacWorld Expo is the third party hardware and software developed and geared towards the Macintosh. Yet this is where the Apple retail store presence is in fact - much stronger than MacWorld Expo could ever hope to be. So the only folks hurt in this group are those who are not represented on the floor of a retail Apple Store. This does include many shareware and lower end software offerings - however - their track record at MacWorld Expo has not exactly been stellar as well. My feeling is that there is and has been a need for some sort of a online event-like affair that more than makes up to these developers the small number of sales generated at a once a year MacWorld Expo held in January.

So far as the iPod and iPhone ecosystems go - they are already well served at and within the CES show - held the second week of January every year in Las Vegas. These events reach a larger retailer base than MacWorld Expo could ever attempt to do.

MacWorld Expo has reached it's expiration date - and now it's time to focus on the new and positive opportunities that it's demise opens.

Christopher Price

December 20, 2008 2:56 AM

Killing off Macworld generates positive opportunities? Michael, you should go work for Apple Media Relations.

Liz Hoffman

December 22, 2008 8:03 PM

Steve finally resolved my question for many years: Why doesn't Apple sponsor its own ecosystem shows? Can you imagine Intel and MS allow others do THEIR shows? I would love to see a show that is entirely under Steve's control.

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Bloomberg Businessweek writers Peter Burrows, Cliff Edwards, Olga Kharif, Aaron Ricadela, and Douglas MacMillan, dig behind the headlines to analyze what’s really happening throughout the world of technology. Tech Beat covers everything from tech bellwethers like Apple, Google, and Intel and emerging new leaders such as Facebook to new technologies, trends, and controversies.

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