Wanted: Unemployed Scientists and Engineers

Posted by: Michael Mandel on October 19

I’m looking for a bit of help for a story I’m doing on problems in the labor market for ‘knowledge workers’. I’d like to talk to scientists, engineers, designers, etc who have lost their jobs in the last year. So if you know anyone in that category who is willing to be interviewed, please have them drop me a note at michael_mandel@businessweek.com

Thanks.

TrackBack URL for this entry: http://blogs.businessweek.com/mt/mt-tb.cgi/

Reader Comments

juan gonzalez

October 19, 2009 02:47 PM

hellow i am writting about the job of construction near laredo. i have worked in constuction and demo. i have used hydralic tools. and also driven the roller and numatic. i have my transportation. and the tools i need to start. steel toes, hart hat and any other things i may need. call at 956 774 7585. leave a message. or write back. thank you

juan gonzalez

October 19, 2009 02:47 PM

hellow i am writting about the job of construction near laredo. i have worked in constuction and demo. i have used hydralic tools. and also driven the roller and numatic. i have my transportation. and the tools i need to start. steel toes, hart hat and any other things i may need. call at 956 774 7585. leave a message. or write back. thank you

LAO

October 20, 2009 10:33 AM

Sorry, can't help you. All the knowledge worker unemployment I've encountered in recent times is in an area you wisely did not mention because it's so controversial -- software -- and all became unemployed earlier than the past year. One continued to work non-stop for the company that dumped him, as an independent. Another made the leap from a failed cost reduction software company to JP Morgan, just in time for the Bear Stearns collapse and integration. Another manages the warehouse night shift at a cell phone distribution center. Another made a nice profit investing his pre-crash condo sale in gold and Treasuries and shorting Lehman Bros. He moved to a cheaper area and is considering teaching. Another retired early.

A biologist professor/researcher acquaintance is doing fine and just won a $million research grant from foreign sources.

DZ

October 22, 2009 01:44 AM

I would suggest tapping into your contacts in the Pharmaceutical industry. Many researchers have been laid off in big Pharmas in the two years and many have actually chose to go back to their home country (India/China) to join local companies, another interesting point here.

minka99

October 28, 2009 01:44 PM

Hello Michael. I hope you don't fall prey to the common delusion that H1B is a step on the path to green card and eventual citizenship for talented technical foreigners. This is an industry line that not long ago the NYTimes perpetuated. (Matt Richtel's article, "Tech Recruiting Clashes with Immigration Rules".)

The truth is that H1 B is an American visa used overwhelmingly by Indian
software companies. Their engineers go into American firms where they are trained by American engineers and then they go back to India, taking the job to India. In 2006 the three companies who took the most H1 B visa slots were Wipro and Infosys (both Indian companies) and Cognizant Technology Solutions, which has most of its operations in India. These companies took 70% of the H1 B visas. Statistics for 2007 can be found at http://tinyurl.com/cwst2u. This information is easy to find. There have been well publicized Congressional hearings on precisely this topic.

I believe that because engineers and scientists don't have union representation, there is no organized force to counter industry propaganda. There have been repressed studies and blatant misrepresentation that have distorted the truth. I hope you write the truth on these subjects.
Thank you.

CompEng

October 28, 2009 05:31 PM

Minka99,

It probably depends on what you do or where you work. The H1Bs I talk to are of the "path to citizenship variety". But then, I don't work in IT.

bob

November 4, 2009 08:45 PM

H-1B workers are used to lower wages and discourage Americans from entering engineering.

After training my Replacement worker (brought to the US by an indian bodyshop) I left engineering and now manage a pizza delivery place.

I work with three other engineers who laugh(or cry) when the media spews it's propaganda of a "labor shortage"

AlchemX

November 5, 2009 06:23 AM

Looks like Pharma will lose about 55,000 jobs starting January. I think you will have plenty of good stuff then, you should post this then.

Doug

November 5, 2009 05:32 PM

Johnson & Johnson announced layoffs of 6-7% of its workforce, which is about 7,000 employees.

Thank you for your interest. This blog is no longer active.

 

About

Michael Mandel, BW's award-winning chief economist, provides his unique perspective on the hot economic issues of the day. From globalization to the future of work to the ups and downs of the financial markets, Mandel-named 2006 economic journalist of the year by the World Leadership Forum-offers cutting edge analysis and commentary.

BW Mall - Sponsored Links

Buy a link now!