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Android Doubles U.S. Market Share


Android operating system for smartphones has more than doubled its market share in the U.S. between September and December, according to comScore?? survey of more than 30,000 consumers aged 13 and up.

Android?? market share rose from 2.5% in September to 5.2% in December, while BlackBerry maker Research In Motion, Microsoft and Palm lost ground in the U.S. smartphones market, according to comScore. Developed by a consortium of companies lead by Google, Android has gained traction thanks to the introduction of a slew of new handsets that run it, including Google Nexus One and the popular Motorola Droid.

But while Motorola?? new smartphones enjoyed good traction this fall, that didn?? prevent the company from losing more market share in the fourth quarter, as sales of its cheaper phones slowed down further. The world?? largest handset maker, Nokia, lost share as well. The company said recently that it has gained share worldwide, but it?? still having trouble cracking the U.S. market.

Research In Motion, on the other hand, actually gained cell phone market share, as more Americans switched to smartphones and picked up popular handsets like BlackBerry Pearl and Curve, according to comScore. LG gained share as well.

The biggest gainer in handsets, though? Samsung, whose market share expanded from 20.4% of the U.S. market in September to 21.2% in December, according to comScore?? Feb. 8 report. Samsung has continued to come out with highly capable yet inexpensive phones that have been a hit at AT&T, Sprint Nextel and Verizon Wireless. At Verizon, Samsung Omnia, a Windows Mobile-based smartphone, sells for only $10 after an online discount and with a two-year contract. The phone features a 5 Megapixel camera, a touch screen and full Web browser.


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