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Mac Attack in Corporate America

Long before iPod mania and iPhone frenzy, fans of the Mac were lobbying to use their Apples at work. As "The Mac in the Gray Flannel Suit" (Cover Story, May 12) shows, that's now starting to happen. And not just at small outfits: Among the readers we heard from were employees of the Pentagon, NASA, and a big insurer, all of whom say the Mac is a growing presence.—Peter Burrows

I work for a large insurance company, and everything is Windows—we crunch numbers and input data all day. But when my son, a medical student, bought a Mac laptop, I tried it and was hooked! Because of my great experience (as well as others'), the company approved the use of the Mac for PowerPoint, video, and other presentations. I bought a Mac, as did about 30 other people. We now have a Mac user group within this big, cold PC world.

Screen name: George

Corporate America is going to find out that Macs are cheaper to maintain. We lowered our tech staff costs by 25% in the first six months of transition [from PCs to Macs]. And those costs are now 64% lower than when we were an all-PC shop.

Screen name: Jonesp

Apple has a long way to go before being considered by big companies. So many financial, accounting, and other applications run only on Windows. Migrating to a new system is a huge task. I don't think there is a justifiable business gain.

Screen name: Gururaj

In our office, the "higher-ups" have Macbooks, as do the creative and marketing departments. Those of us doing drudgery still use Windows. We're hoping management will upgrade everyone to a Mac, as an office revolution is brewing among "the masses."

Screen name: Marie

Overpopulation Is the Real Problem

Regarding "Solutions From A Hunger Crisis" (News, May 12): Encouraging governments to make efforts to curb their unsustainable populations will do more to help the situation than simply providing food.

Darrin Duber-Smith

DENVER

'Ethanol Is Not a Feasible Solution'

"Is Ethanol Getting a Bum Rap?" (News, May 12) misses the central problems of corn-based ethanol. Corn consumes three to five gallons of water per gallon of ethanol produced. So the 7 billion gallons of ethanol made last year consumed about 30 billion gallons of increasingly scarce, pure water. About 150 pounds of nitrogen fertilizer per acre are used to produce the high crop yields lauded in the article. Of that, 20 to 40 pounds leach into water sheds. Ethanol is not a feasible solution. Is there a biofuel solution? Yes, possibly: Small-scale production of algae-based biofuels. Maybe all that's missing is an algae fuel lobby.

Kenneth Tentarelli

NEWBURY, N.H.

Keep Gender Out of the Doctor Equation

Attributing the coming shortage of physicians to growing numbers of women in the profession is like blaming the proverbial canary for causing the coal mine's toxic air ("Are There Too Many Women Doctors?" What's Next, Apr. 28). Why not encourage the best and the brightest (independent of gender, age, or economic status) to pursue medicine? That's the way to provide the health care this nation needs.

Dr. Diane Magrane

Ed Salsberg

Assn. of American Medical Colleges

WASHINGTON, D.C.


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