Companies & Industries

Robert Damon


President, North America, Korn/Ferry Intl.

Company Info: Korn/Ferry Intl.

Web site: www.kornferry.com

Address: 1900 Ave. of the Stars, Suite 2600, Los Angeles, Calif. 90067

Phone: 310-843-4133

E-mail: bob.damon@kornferry.com

Advice: Always lead by example. Stay humble and hungry. Never stop learning. Treat everyone with the same high degree of mutual respect and trust.

Qualities sought in emerging leaders: Realistic optimists who are coachable and self-aware. I also look for individuals with a diversity of experiences both personal and professional. Someone who is a risk-taker and who has experienced failure is also desirable.

Sector specialization: Consumer, retail, sports/entertainment, private equity, hospitality/leisure

Job function specialization: CEOs, GMs, board directors

Geographical Focus: North America

Companies I often recruit for: Under Armour; Easton-Bell Sports; Oakley; Burger King ; Texas Pacific Group

Favorite historical figure: President Ronald Regan. He had the vision to understand the dynamics of the Cold War and the perseverance to win it.

Education: Purdue Univ., BS, Industrial Management/Economics, 1970, and MS, Management/Industrial Relations, 1971

Languages: English

Employment history: Korn/Ferry International, President, North America, 2004 to present; Spencer Stuart, Vice-Chairman and Western Region Manager, 1991-2004; Norman Broadbent International, President, U.S., 1981-91; Earlier experience as a consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton and six years with Arcata Corp.

Other interests: Mountain climbing, adventure racing, shooting, boxing, American muscle cars

Professional/Membership Affiliations: San Francisco Yacht Club, Silver Leaf Club, NRA

Experience in executive search consulting: 29 years

High Profile Placement: NFL Commissioner, 2007

Other paths I might have pursued: Teaching and coaching

The global business trend that will most influence corporate performance in the future: The global shortage of general management talent will ultimately impact both the public and private sectors unless companies find better ways to develop people.


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