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Advertising in Web 3.0


It was almost a year ago that I posted an item on Web 3.0 (as envisioned in a meeting room in Monte Carlo). The conversation continues, even as my memories of that meeting fade.

Here’s a question for you:

What will advertising be like in Web 3.0? Will we get only the ads we want? If so, will we pay for them, directly or indirectly? Will this sustain industries (including ours)?

By the way, I know from the comments that a lot of people are put off by the name Web 3.0, and consider it hype. They’re not entirely wrong. But people pay attention to it. The most recent commenter points out that that post is on the first Google page on the subject, a rare distinction for this blog. Where do you think it would have landed if I had dubbed it: Hazy Speculation on Future of Networked Communication?

The point is, without that Google juice (produced in part by my unconscious but nonetheless brilliant branding) the lively conversation that continues on that post would instead be a lonely soliloquy.

By the way, I got a kick out of many of the comments, including this one from Colin Bell:

I thought web 3 sounds good, I could follow most of the thinking, when a technology, scrip or language emerges that will enable all electronic content to work from a single platform, then that one interface will do everything.

Imagine,

* tagging at birth

* every piece of information we will ever need during our lives accessed at the blink of an eye

* total control of our live, tracking, timekeeping, spend profile, spare backed-up brain

* health sensing to anticipate when we will need a coffin, ordering it, paying for it and then having it delivered (just in time, of course)

* and then after death a final print out audit trail to give to the vicar

I think I'm off to the pub, it all sounds pretty depressing now I've thought about it.

Posted by: Colin Bell at February 27, 2007 08:10 PM


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