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Easing Fears about Off-Shoring


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May 24, 2007

Easing Fears about Off-Shoring

Steve Hamm

Just as the immigration debate soars to a feverish pitch in the United States, some of the top Indian outsourcing firms are making moves that could ease some of the fears among Americans about losing their jobs to off-shoring. Wipro, TCS, and Infosys have all stepped up their recruiting in the US of American citizens. They plan on hiring thousands. In the past, most of their employees here were Indians on temporary assignment. Now, they're hiring the locals. It's mainly because they need people with on-the-ground knowledge, but their moves could have the side benefit (assuming fear mongers like Lou Dobbs are paying attention) of taking a little of the negative pressure off of India.

08:24 AM

Off-shoring

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Steve, as an author of such repute, you surely got to quote some numbers or write more in detail as to how you got this information!

But I guess this is expected and should go a long way to ease the fears of Americans about offshoring.

Posted by: Z at May 25, 2007 01:50 PM

So we have another PR stunt? And we should take it as real for some reason?

Posted by: dw at May 25, 2007 02:28 PM

I presume still most of the Indian companies are yet to mature to be truly Multinational. Many multinational companies have the objective of recruting the people from the place they operate. It is a corporate social responsibility to give back to the society from which you are getting the money from. The cheap source of manpower should not only be the key competitive advantage of Indian Software companies, as they will disapper slowly with the spiralling increase in the cost of living in India.

Best regards,

Ramesh Natarajan

Dubai

My views on India : visit my blog unsual views on Indian economy.. http://fusions.wordpress.com

Posted by: Ramesh Natarajan at May 25, 2007 02:44 PM

Sustainable relationship between two countries is based on 'give and take' principle. US senators scrutinizing Indian companies would invite equal/or even more scrutiny of the US companies aggressively looking into expanding in the Indian market by the Indian parliament. The bottom line: logic and practicality would be taken over by politics at both ends. The winner: companies that could hire more lobbyists at the Capital Hill in US and at the North/South block in India (read: bribing the US & Indian lawmakers to get their job done). Someone should be more pragmatic about the whole issue of immigration and cross-country flow of talents in the era of globalization. Anyone with certain points based on skills and educational credentials (something similar to what Canadian and Australian systems do), should be given life long visa to visit each other's countries and to do business. Let?? not politics take over the future of our children.

Posted by: Binay at May 26, 2007 03:11 AM

Who is the brainchild that said gasoline prices should be over $4.00 a gallon. This so called genious must have paid travel expenses and does not drive his or her own car.

I don't own a suv but I sure wouldn't take it upon myself to try to tell someone else what they should drive. This same person probably pushed to get religeon out of schools and court houses.

Posted by: ken quigley at May 26, 2007 10:49 AM

How much "negative pressure" is there, any more? In my personal experience, if I'd rate 2004 as 5/10 on the cacophony scale, 2007 is more like 0.5/10... but maybe, I'm missing something?

Posted by: Prashant at May 28, 2007 08:54 PM

Prashant,

It is not election season yet. By 2008, Democrats will start fear-mongering about outsourcing again, even though the US has created 7 million jobs in the last 3 years, and unemployment is lower than it has been for 35 of the last 38 years.

Posted by: Kartik at May 29, 2007 03:08 PM


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