Businessweek Archives

Stanford Has a Design Job For You


Why Design is Big in Davos |

Main

| Core77 Throws a Great Design/innovation Conference

January 17, 2006

Stanford Has a Design Job For You

Bruce Nussbaum

Are you ready for a dream job in design education? I'm told that Stanford is looking for a new professor to lead the famous Joint Design Program. The tenure-track position is open and the chosen one will teach and develop the undergraduate and masters program in design. I hear that Stanford is looking for an exceptional leader, who may or may not have a Ph.d and who may or may not have much direct design experience. That certainly opens up the search to top designers and design managers from around the world.

Here's a portion of the statement offering the design position: "We seek candidates who conduct creative and independent research and teaching programs with a deep understanding of design thinking and who draw on art, engineering and behavioral sciences. We are recruiting new faculty in this area because there is a growing need to

understand how users experience products, services, environments and information, how products acquire a cultural significance, how designers can best learn their craft and how groups and organizations shape (and are shaped by) the practice of design. These issues

require familiarity with design methodologies and draw upon a number of research fields across engineering, art, interaction design, organizational behavior, social sciences and business. The

ideal candidate will be an accomplished designer and educator with experience in the conception and creation of products, services, interactive technology, environments and experiences, as well as an interest in the avant-garde. The ideal candidate will also need to be

a strategic thinker and contribute to the advancement and development of design as a discipline at Stanford."

Actually, my favorite part of the job offer is this: "Stanford University offers an appealing setting for faculty who wish to teach and do research in this area." Talk about understatement.

08:25 PM

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://blogs.businessweek.com/mt/mt-tb.cgi/

Imagine, getting to sit around and think, write and research, ponder and pontificate, in that gorgeous campus, and get paid for it. heaven on earth :)

Posted by: Niti Bhan at January 18, 2006 06:34 AM

There is a lot of value to this blog as it

brings together a lot of valuable information

like this.

As for the post, yes, it is a brilliant one.

However, I have the following to bring up from

my side:-

1) Can 'Joint Design Program' of Stanford

participate in history?

The reason I am asking this question is simple.

Let us say if Stanford were to launch this

program at the time of Wright Brothers. Would

Wright Brothers have considered it? If not,

how would Stanford facilitate to participate

in their historic invention and position Joint

Design Program?

If Stanford answers this question, I think they

can nail the candidate easily, given the

homework they have done so well in terms of

defining the position.

So, we pose the question again: What if Wright

Brothers' situation repeats today?

2)If Wright Brothers were to succeed in business,

they would have needed a host of support, given

the vastness of the invention they were seeding.

Hence, if we were to put a Board together to

govern them, I would define it the same way as

in job description; but add the following eminent

support even before going public with the invention,

in addition to base/ foundation set up and core

invention:-

a) Best early stage investor who can smell

an opportunity miles away.

b) Best IP/Patent attorneys who can position

IP proactively to protect it from business

sharks. For example, how could Wright Bros.

protect themselves from Curtis' litigation?

One answer I came up with was to see if

Wright Bros. could show only take-off and

cruising and leave out showing landing

altogether(if at all possible). That way

anybody can copy at their own risk...!?

c) Team of globalization experts

d) Best of Region Development experts

c & d would cover China & India and

align products accordingly. These

societies have hidden cash or can even

help unravel hidden cash in other markets

or atleast save cash in primary markets.

A set of guys who can knit 'regions' with

mission that best of things are yet to come.

e) Technologists from Apple (Design

showmanship in "Digital Clay". For them

computing is like 'digital clay'. I don't

know whether they have realized this trait

in themselves.), Game machine specialists

from SONY (future of dashboards are in game

machines) game consoles), etc.

e) Nuts and bolts experts. Because I want to

concentrate on invention and innovation

rather than day-to-day nuts-n-bolts. I

should be working with architect clay,

wind tunnel & models, actual design,etc.

f) Theoreticians who can help me with

conviction because I will be generating new

theory everyday and there is no way they can

hunt proof in references; rather they would

have to convincingly support new theories.

g) Key business strategists who are also

experts in game theory who can help

with 'order of exposure' of invention

so that one can focus on vision and what is

'beyond' rather than immediate hurdles.

h) Need good CTO's: Chief Talent Officers.

This is critical in highly connected global

scenario.

Posted by: A.K. Vishwanath. at January 21, 2006 07:25 PM


The Good Business Issue
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW
 
blog comments powered by Disqus