Businessweek Archives

Share Your Life on the Web


? Those reinvention blues |

Main

| The Tao of Blogs, Part I ?

August 19, 2005

Share Your Life on the Web

Rob Hof

Want to tell the story of your life on the Web? I'd love to hear it. Why? In researching the best sites and services on the Web for an upcoming feature, I'm realizing that there's no better way to find out what's the best than to see how people really use this stuff in their everyday lives. I want to know what sticks (and frankly, what sucks).

OK, I know if you're reading this blog, you're probably somewhere out on the leading edge, maybe even bleeding a bit. But that's what I'm looking for--people who can't live without the Internet, or for whom it's so essential that they even don't think about "getting on the Internet." If it's not too much trouble, email me with a sense of how you live on the Web. With your permission, I'll share your experiences on the blog, and I think all of us will benefit from your insights. Thanks!

03:41 PM

Web 2.0

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://blogs.businessweek.com/mt/mt-tb.cgi/

Hi,

I started to live with the Internet about 10 years ago when a friend gave me Internet for Dummies one Christmas. I shortly afterwards converted my business consultancy to an Internet consultancy.

All of us at Denaploy work either from our own homes or from the offices in my house. I am lucky enough to have lots of room so my children can use the office computers when we are not using them, and this was one of my main objectives in setting up the business – I wanted my children to grow up in the environment and for them to know that it was a part of their life right form the start.

I do not commute (environmentally friendly) and I can juggle the demands of the business with the demands of the children – especially important during school holidays. The business is tough and not mega profitable, but it provides us with a living and we have some very loyal customers that we have been working with for years and for whom we manage an important element of their business. We have sometimes thought of building ‘the next great piece of software’, but on the whole I believe we are better off concentrating on understanding how to use the existing software to improve business processes. This also gives us every excuse to go out and experiment with all the new stuff that comes out at an increasing rate.

Stephen Milton BSc ARCS MBA

England

Posted by: Stephen Milton at August 27, 2005 12:46 PM


Toyota's Hydrogen Man
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW
 
blog comments powered by Disqus