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Wikipedia: the French beg to differ


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August 14, 2005

Wikipedia: the French beg to differ

Stephen Baker

In the different languages of Wikipedia, history takes different turns, David Weinberger points out. The Japanese and Korean versions of the open-source encyclopedia differ on various islands, predictably enough, and the French don't necessarily agree with the Anglos that the Wright Brothers invented the airplane. These international Wikipedias are a great resource for cultural studies. Ross Mayfield has more.

07:30 AM

Wikis

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Wiki seems to be a solution looking for a problem.

If it works, I'm all for it.

An imprint of the National Academy of Sciences, the Joseph Henry Press was created to improve public understanding of science by making books on science, technology, and health more widely available.

Read more than 3,000 books online FREE!

http://www.nap.edu/about.html#jhp

TRY IT.

Spinal Cord Injury: Progress, Promise, and Priorities (2005)

Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health

http://www.nap.edu/books/0309095859/html

Techie stuff

Terms have been algorithmically extracted from the text of this book. Oddities occur; select the terms most likely to provide you with high-value results.

I discovered 8 chapters found with a hit on ["motor neuron"]and found it fast.

I don't know how wikis will make information easier to find. I view wiki as trivial and not scientific. This may be an unpopular view. If wiki works for you, that's great.

Posted by: Jim Dermitt at August 14, 2005 10:30 AM

I had to laugh at this:

"Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines."

Don't do too much thinking, just let the search engine figure everything out. I can now get information that I'm not supposed to read, because it's exclusively for search engines. Just turn your brain off while you are at it. I thought it was funny. I guess you had to be here.

Posted by: Jim Dermitt at August 14, 2005 10:53 AM

Sir or Madam:

The phrase is "beg leave to differ," not "beg to differ." In polite

conversation or civil written use, one does not beg to disagree. That's tantamount to "Let's fight."

One begs permission to disagree, a rhetorical nicety that is seldom used because of the deterioration of our language. Nevertheless, I know that "beg leave to differ" is standard "good" English and "beg to differ" is bad; now so do you.

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John Mason Mings

Consultancy

619 West Main Street

Grafton, West Virginia 26354-1154

304-265-4214

http://users.adelphia.net/?Poete

Posted by: John Mings at October 7, 2005 10:07 AM


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