Business Schools

Nancy Hauserman's Book Recommendations


Reading List:

DESTINY OF CHANGE by Kenneth R. Schneider

"This is a wonderful book for people who want to think about the role of the individual and individual ethics in industrial society. I have spent a number of years thinking, teaching and writing about how people behave in their business roles. While there is much argument to the contrary, I believe that people do not behave so differently at work and at home - that they are not ethical at work and not at home. Schneider's book provides a way to think about individual morality and the importance of the fostering a moral culture."

THE SNEETCHES AND OTHER STORIES by Dr. Seuss

"Several of the stories in this book offer wonderful illustrations of important management lessons. In particular, "The Sneetches" and "The Zax". "The Sneetches" provides a lovely illustration about the dangers of assimilation and the power of recognizing and accepting one's differences and strengths. "The Zax" is a fine story about conflict management or the lack thereof. Two Zax come head to head as they are walking in different directions - one going South and one going North. The beauty of these stories is that they provide very clear messages in a totally non-threatening way and let people relax with what are often difficult subjects."

GEEK LOVE by Katherine Dunn

"While this would likely strike most readers as an extremely odd choice of favorites, this book changed the way I think about my own view of normal and the erroneous judgments I may have made about people's preferences. In particular, this work changed the way that I think about what constitutes "normal" and how that term is used, particularly to describe physical appearance. In her unusual story, Dunn tells the story of a family that purposely produces children who have physical "abnormalities". The children are loved by the parents not in spite of their physical differences but because of those differences. The children and the parents value the differences in ways that are very uncommon in our society."

THE SMALL ROOM by May Sarton

"This is the story of a woman professor having to come to terms with her discovery that a favorite student has cheated. Her story resonated naturally resonated with me, as a woman professor who seeks to be compassionate but not a pushover, fair and just. Around the time I read the book I had dealt with my first case of cheating in my classroom. I was devastated - surprised and disappointed, having somehow expected that if I was friendly, fair, kind, and so on, that all of my students would respond in a like manner. Sarton's work allowed me both to see the incident in a less personalized way and to think about my own naivete as a contributing factor in my strong reaction."

IN THE SKIN OF A LION by Michael Ondaatje

"I do not think I fully understood the concept of epiphany before I read this book and it is that thought which I continue to hold onto. There is a scene in which a nun falls from a bridge and is, miraculously caught be a man doing construction work on the bridge. In the moment of her fall she understood that she did not want to be a nun. Ondaatje's brilliant description of that moment of self-realization and revelation spoke to me about how we can come to know ourselves and that the truth about what we need is usually within us. I now keep a dish of beautiful stones on my desk - I called them epiphany stones. Though I often want to throw them at people so that they can really see their lives, I use them only to remind myself that people have the capability to see the truth."

NO FUTURE WITHOUT FORGIVENESS by Desmond Mpilo Tutu

"As a person who has worked in the area of conflict management (University Ombudsperson), taught courses in Negotiation, conducted employee and management conflict management seminars and now functions as a Dean of an Undergraduate Program, I have had many occasions to see and work with people's anger and hurt. As the major force behind the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa, Desmond Tutu has provided all of us with another way, his "third way" of healing hurt and diminishing anger. There is not a day that goes by that I do not reflect upon his teachings and use his work as my own example. In particular, the notion that a person's life can actually be enriched by pain and conflict and then forgiveness gave me a different way to talk to employees, students, and parents who were angry or hurt or carrying a long grudge. In this book, Tutu writes with humor, seriousness, and compassion about his life, his work and the lessons he has learned. Clearly this learning has not come without cost but he is wise and brave and I was the lucky recipient of his strengths."

Biographical Info:

Nancy Hauserman is an Associate Dean of the Undergraduate Teaching Program, and a Williams Teaching Professor at theUniversity of Iowa. Nancy Hauserman ,earned her B.A. in Political Science from the University of Rhode Island and her J.D. from the University of Iowa. She is a Professor in the Department of Management and Organizations, College of Business Administration and holds the Williams Teaching chair in the College. In August 1999, she was appointed Associate Dean of the Undergraduate Program in the Tippie College of Business. She served as as Ombudsperson for the University of Iowa for three years. Professor Hauserman teaches courses in introductory law, ethics, critical incidents in teaching and diversity issues.

She has been recognized as an outstanding teacher and has won several awards and honors at the University of Iowa.

She has published in the areas of sexual harassment, ethics, whistleblowing, media law, and economic aspects of family law. She has conducted workshops and training sessions in both the public and private sectors in the areas of conflict management, ethics, diversity, and sexual harassment in the United States, Finland, Sweden and Russia. She frequently serves as an expert witness in sexual harassment cases.


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