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Does the EU Want Poles to Stay at Home?


Christopher Condon writes that the Polish government cannot attract manual workers from the countryside to work in the cities ("The EU: Some may be more equal than others," European Business, Apr. 30). In reality, the government could do a lot more to ease the chronic lack of affordable housing and the huge discrepancies in the cost of living between the larger cities and the rural hinterland. I feel sure that the latent potential for a significant migration of workers from the Polish countryside to other European Union states without these problems was, rightly or wrongly, in the backs of the minds of EU negotiators.

Andy Williams

Warsaw Like the founder of a struggling dot-com urging a venture capitalist to throw good money after bad, Stanley Reed urges President Bush to invest precious time and credibility in pursuing the failed Middle East policies of the Clinton Administration ("The Mideast: Why Bush must keep up the pressure," The Middle East, Apr. 30). Israel has nothing whatsoever to gain by igniting a regional war or embroiling the international community in its affairs. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the Palestinians, who want to gain a state of their own without renouncing their claims to pre-1967 Israel. It is Chairman Arafat, not Israeli Prime Minister Sharon, who has emerged as the major "threat to wider U.S. interests in the region."

David Hoffman

Jerusalem I entirely agree with the Wall Street headhunter who said that the Net analysts have "not been properly punished." In Mary Meeker's case, I feel she needs censure more for her apparent lack of remorse than for her stock recommendations ("Tech's cheerleader won't say die," Information Technology, Apr. 30). Surely, in her pre-teens, Mary would have learned that one cannot indefinitely blow a balloon or stretch a rubber band! Has she learned now?

Ravi Ghai

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia


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