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Y2 K Didn't Bug Small Biz


Frontier -- In Box

Y2K Didn't Bug Small Biz

During the countdown to 2000, tech soothsayers bashed small businesses for largely ignoring the millennium computer bugs ostensibly lurking in their computers. (An estimated one-quarter of small companies chose to do nothing to fight Y2K, according to the National Federation of Independent Business.) So why was there such a smooth rollover to 2000, with scant reports of small-company computers going on the fritz? Turns out the Y2K brain trust missed some details: For one, many small companies--some 20%--don't even use computers. Of those that do, most use off-the-shelf software, which proves easier to fix than the custom code deployed inside corporations. What's more, the NFIB reported that 9 in 10 small companies upgraded critical systems over the past two years with Y2K-compliant gear. Says Dillon Jackson, a Seattle lawyer who studied the potential effects of Y2K: "This was a yawner." Small businesses, it seems, were rightfully resting easy from the get-go.Edited by Dennis Berman


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