Businessweek Archives

The Cold War Won't End Until China Renounces Communism (Int'l Edition)


International -- Readers Report

THE COLD WAR WON'T END UNTIL CHINA RENOUNCES COMMUNISM (int'l edition)

Bruce Nussbaum's commentary about the historical roots of the current Asian financial crisis is both timely and informative ("Asia's crisis: The cold war's final legacy," Asian Business, Dec. 1). The cold war has indeed given rise to crony capitalism in the Asian countries, including Japan and Taiwan, fostering many uncompetitive commercial practices and resulting in a huge oversupply of certain categories of goods. The political arrangements, too, suggest that political democracy is yet to be fully established in the Asia-Pacific region.

It would be premature, however, for us to herald the end of the cold war in these parts of the world. China, after all, has officially refused to renounce one-party rule or the command-and-control, centralized economy. Indeed, the existence of a huge and economically growing totalitarian state such as China makes it very hard for countries around it to proceed with radical reorganization and restructuring of their economies and political systems.

By stubbornly refusing to consider political democracy and refusing to do away with the Communist Party's leadership role, the Chinese are, in effect, prolonging the cold war in the region. No totalitarian state can remain benign forever, especially one as large and economically powerful as China.

Florian Pantazi

Brasov, Romania

I am writing to applaud Bruce Nussbaum's commentary on the current state of the Asian crisis. Nussbaum brings keen insight to this situation through the lens of world history since World War II. As the proprietor of an international commodity business who witnesses reverberations of the recent Pacific Rim meltdown every day, I thought Nussbaum's comments encapsulated the situation completely and concisely. I have recommended it to many friends and business associates as a perfect description of what is happening in that region and why.

Andrew Hewson

President

Hewson Metals

New YorkReturn to top

CASH-STRAPPED COMPANIES NEED MORE THAN JUST CASH (int'l edition)

"Asia's challenge" (Special Report, Dec. 1) suggests that amassing large cash reserves (the "cash is king" philosophy) is a way for corporations to tackle the challenges related to excessive debt, overexpanded operating capacity, unfocused businesses, and a fixation on accumulating property.

These challenges, however, are all signs of poorly managed companies. Amassing large cash reserves is not a proper response. Indeed, it is usually a signal that a company's management cannot figure out a viable strategy for investing. Although proper cash management is critical, the real key to creating value over the long run is to make sure that a company chooses investments and financing strategies that result in the generation of a growing stream of earnings from normal operating activities.

Lawrence A. Gordon

Ernst & Young Alumni Professor of

Managerial Accounting

College of Business & Management

University of Maryland

College Park, Md.Return to top

MICROSOFT'S BROWSER DOESN'T MAKE OR BREAK WIN95 (int'l edition)

Microsoft's Internet Explorer is not a natural extension of an operating system, as Microsoft maintains ("The feds should let Microsoft be Microsoft," Economic Viewpoint, Dec. 1, and "Justice vs. Microsoft: What's the big deal?" Information Processing, Dec. 1). A browser is designed to perform a specific task--navigate the Internet. Microsoft's explanation that Internet Explorer is to the operating system what a windshield wiper is to a car does not hold, because without a wiper a car cannot run in the rain. Without Internet Explorer, Windows 95 can run perfectly well.

Ruggero B. Dangelo

Rambouillet, FranceReturn to top


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