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Better Service Gives A Web Site Its Wallop


Readers Report

BETTER SERVICE GIVES A WEB SITE ITS WALLOP

"Making money on the Net" (Cover Story, Sept. 23) excluded the thing that Web sites such as ours have been particularly successful at--servicing. The increased access our members have to our education, research, and networking facilities via the Web has improved our business. We can tell our prospects and new members about the services we provide, thus improving utilization of those services. And we are able to better customize our services through the detailed and rapid feedback we get.

Robert A. Rowan

Manager of Member Services

Institute for Private Investors

Summit, N.J.Return to top

KUDOS FOR A STAND ON GAY RIGHTS

Your editorial standing up for the civil rights of gay and lesbian Americans ("Gay rights, corporate style," Oct. 7) shows guts and respect for an American value system emphasizing tolerance and pluralism.

The corporate citizens extending medical benefits to same-sex couples also are to be commended. Some say business should mirror society. Winners realize they can do more--they can lead.

In today's rapidly changing and competitive global economy, successful businesses cannot afford any strategy that does less than attract the best new talent and encourage all employees to contribute to the fullest extent possible.

In championing the cause of social justice, Corporate America never looked better.

Jim Eskin

San AntonioReturn to top

CAN WELFARE BE MADE UNNECESSARY?

In "What the poor need: Jobs, jobs, jobs" (Books, Oct. 7), Keith H. Hammonds perceptively highlights William Julius Wilson's conclusion that we must, in Hammonds' words, "take care of the poor by taking care of everyone."

Even if jobs were available in the ghetto, many people at the bottom couldn't take them because they would lose government benefits. Often, they can't do better on an entry-level wage than on government support. We must restructure government assistance to meet the dual objectives of getting the poor into jobs--any jobs--and allowing them to live decently on even entry-level pay. Workfare and the new welfare-reform law have accepted the former objective while forgetting the latter, which is critical to long-term success.

The Institute for Socioeconomic Studies is currently researching a universal plan that would do this--a plan not to reform welfare but to make it unnecessary. Hammonds' insights and Wilson's perspectives give us encouragement that we are on the right track.

Leonard M. Greene

President

Institute for Socioeconomic Studies

White Plains, N.Y.Return to top

VEGGIES AND VITAMINS VS. GENE THERAPY

It might be profitable to search for and eventually market longevity genes--and then again it might not ("Die young at an old age," Science & Technology, Oct. 7). The medical evidence is now overwhelming that diets high in fruits and vegetables--along with relatively inexpensive nutritional supplements such as vitamins C and E, carotenoids, and others--help prevent disease and likely extend life expectancy. These vitamins and vitamin-like substances are a lot less expensive than gene therapy will ever be, and they can help preserve the genes you've already got. Who is going to pay for longevity-gene therapy? Your insurer? A stingy government that wants people to fend for themselves? Get real.

Jack Challem

Editor & Publisher

The Nutrition Reporter

Aloha, Ore.Return to top


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