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More On Nike's Overseas Labor Pain


Readers Report

MORE ON NIKE'S OVERSEAS LABOR PAIN

Your story on Nike Inc.'s production practices in Indonesia greatly understates the impact of our efforts on behalf of subcontracted workers ("Pangs of conscience," International Business, July 29). The facts are that Nike subcontractors, on a 25-day wage scale, are already paying minimums above $2.59 and average wages of $4.76. Meanwhile, factories that shifted to the new 30-day minimum wage took away bonuses to compensate for the increase--bonuses that Nike subcontractors continue to pay for attendance, productivity improvements, and transportation fees, in addition to free meals and medical care.

This compensation is fair. Ongoing, independent audits by Ernst & Young show workers accumulate significant savings. At what the article refers to as the "hell" of Nikomas Gemilang, a December, 1994, audit found 60% of line workers save more than 25% of their monthly pay. In addition, wages have risen 44% since the audit.

David B.Taylor

Vice-President, Production

Nike Inc.

Beaverton, Ore.Return to top

ONLY HALF THE STORY ON E-DATA?

The article on E-data Corp. ("E-Commerce: Who owns the rights?" Science & Technology, July 29) was anything but fair.

You do not include comments made by David Fink, E-data's patent counsel as to "prior art." Fink expressed his opinion of its inapplicability to the actual claims of our patent.

My own background is described in language which constitutes character assassination. I have never been barred from selling stock. In 1975, I pleaded "no contest" to securities laws violations after fighting the charges for over three years. I have never been an investment banker.

The comments about our amnesty program are misleading. There is nothing in the mailed package that accuses any of its recipients of infringement.

In conclusion, we find it inappropriate for you to publish so biased an article.

Arnold L. Freilich

President

E-data Corp.

Secaucus, N.J.Return to top

NOT SO MICRO AT SGS-THOMSON

SGS-Thomson Microelectronics, Europe's largest independent semiconductor producer, appears to have been overlooked in the Global 1000. As of May 31, the survey date, its market capitalization stood at $5.8 billion, which would place it 550th or so in the BUSINESS WEEK Global 1000 (July 8).

Pasquale Pistorio

President & CEO

SGS-Thomson Microelectronics Inc.

Saint Genis Pouilly, FranceReturn to top

REPORTS OF ITS DEATH ARE GREATLY EXAGGERATED

Your feature on Leon Black ("Wall Street's Dr. No," Finance, July 29) incorrectly refers to E-II Holdings as "formerly American Brands Inc." American Brands did own E-II from February to July, 1988. We purchased several operations from E-II then sold it to a subsidiary of Riklis Family Corp.American Brands Inc. is alive and quite well.

Robert J. Rukeyser

Senior Vice-President

American Brands Inc.

Old Greenwich, Conn.Return to top


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