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China: Don't Punish Business For Politicians' Crimes (Int'l Edition)


International -- Readers Report

CHINA: DON'T PUNISH BUSINESS FOR POLITICIANS' CRIMES (int'l edition)

In "Trade with China: Add bite to America's bark" (Economic Viewpoint, May 13), Professor Dornbusch was right in stating that Washington and Beijing are playing by different sets of rules. But he proposed a strange suggestion: that if China does not comply with certain stated objectives, most-favored-nation status should be withdrawn automatically. That is equivalent to saying that U.S. trade and business as well as the Chinese people (not the government) should be punished automatically if the Chinese government does not behave. I believe it would be in America's best interests to stick to its own rules: delink international trade and investment with politics.

Chi-Chu Chou

Associate Professor

Feng Chia University

Taichung, TaiwanReturn to top

WHY AMERICA BULLIES CUBA (int'l edition)

You're right on the money with your story "The real Asian threat: Mercantilism" (Editorial, Apr. 15). The only item conspicuously absent from your list of inconsistent U.S. government policies was Cuba. America's imposition of economic sanctions--against a country that has for years been as much of a threat to the U.S. as Bermuda--is the epitome of a double standard. The economic measures taken against Cuba are grossly out of proportion to any imagined threat and are clearly a direct result of a superpower's feeling of impotence in imposing its will on a small but stubborn Caribbean island. While China, despite its atrocious human-rights record, receives most-favored-nation status, Cuba, an economic basket case by any standard, gets its embargo tightened as the result of the provoked shooting-down of two U.S.-registered aircraft.

Paul Plesman

TorontoReturn to top

KOHL IS NOT A PATCH ON THATCHER (int'l edition)

Your article "Kohl the knife" (International Business, May 13), give German Chancellor Helmut Kohl the credit for trying to reform the German welfare state. But you cannot call it a Kohl revolution. It ought to be called the Kohl time lag: 14 years of wasted time. It took him that long a period to realize that something was rotten in the state of Germany. And even now, he has had to be pushed by others. For a contrast, take a look at what Margaret Thatcher managed to accomplish in Britain in just a couple of years.

Thomas Schuback

Hollern, GermanyReturn to top


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