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The Bustle Of Renewal In Berlin (Int'l Edition)


International -- Readers Report

THE BUSTLE OF RENEWAL IN BERLIN (int'l edition)

As a professor in Berlin, I can attest that the present budget crisis is painful ("So much for Berlin's dream of glory," International Business, Apr. 22). My research budget is down. Overall, the outlook is less favorable than when I arrived from the U.S. two years ago.

Your writer, however, appears to have been in Germany long enough to learn to see a glass half-full as half-empty. Berlin is a city in motion, where hardly a subway, street, or building is not being rebuilt. It is an exciting time to live here, and I remain confident that the investment being made will continue to pay off long after this crisis is forgotten.

W. Ted Masselink

Humboldt University

BerlinReturn to top

PUT BUSINESS WEEK ON THE WEB? (int'l edition)

Thank you for your excellent coverage of developments in the digital world ("America Online's global push," Cover Story, Apr. 22). The article, however, revealed a shortcoming about online activities: BUSINESS WEEK has apparently chosen to favor AOL members by offering an online service that cannot be accessed through the World Wide Web. Why not give all regular readers of your magazine an exclusive access to a secure BUSINESS WEEK site on the Web?

Reinier Evers

Amsterdam

Editor's note: BUSINESS WEEK is building a Web site. Portions of the magazine are available at http://www.business week.com and on the Web's Electronic Newsstand at http://www.enews.com.Return to top

THALIDOMIDE: A WARY WELCOME (int'l edition)

Thank you for "Thalidomide is back" (Industries, Apr. 22), which discusses this wondrous but poisonous drug. We have to be aggressive in pressuring the Food & Drug Administration to research possible side effects of new pills and restrict those that would do harm. Thalidomide relieved morning sickness in many women, but 10,000 babies were deformed by it. This disaster could have been prevented if other governments had restricted its use--as the U.S. did. It is great news that thalidomide may alleviate AIDS, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and tuberculosis. Still, the drug should not be made legal until its side effects are taken care of.

Sen-Gin Liu

San Jose, Costa RicaReturn to top


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