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Some Pc Buyers Want To Show Gateway The Door


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SOME PC BUYERS WANT TO SHOW GATEWAY THE DOOR

Perhaps the mail-order houses are capturing the market ("The computer is in the mail (really)," Information Processing, Jan. 23). But if they're not careful, they're going to lose it just as fast. Over the past five years, our company purchased numerous packages from Gateway.

We were impressed with the quality and value of the units, and early on we encouraged business associates and suppliers to look at the advantages of

mail-order computers. Our views are changing.

Our latest unit came equipped with an extra-large, very expensive monitor. From the beginning, it was problematic, and its soul has finally gone to the big digital warehouse in the sky. We followed procedure by calling Gateway's tech service.

We made half a dozen calls daily and got: "We're busy and can't take your call. Try calling later." I faxed Gateway and pleaded for a human being to respond. That was three weeks ago. We've been without a functioning unit for a total of five weeks with no response and no hope of resolving the problem.

R. Denny Blew

Chief Operating Mfficer

Centerton Nursery Inc.

Bridgeton, N.J.

Last year, the monitor of a system of Gateway 2000 I'd just bought broke down. It took me more than eight months and more than 20 faxes to get my money back. Sure, a mail-order company has some virtues. But its corporate system is as primitive as mom-and-pop stores.

Nobuyuki Ito

Higashiosaka, Japan

Editor's note: Gateway says these complaints are remnants of an unanticipated increase in demand and the old structure of the customer-service department. It says it has already increased by 50% the number of calls it can take and will increase it by another 50% in the next two months.


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