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The Top 20 For Nondegree Study


Special Report

THE TOP 20 FOR NONDEGREE STUDY

Want to bone up on the latest in marketing or operations? Need help in making the transition to general management after years in finance? Or simply want the newest thinking on global competition? BUSINESS WEEK's ranking of B-school programs for executives sheds some light on where to go.

The programs range from two-day seminars on such topics as customer satisfaction to 11-week-long sessions on general management. To create the guide, we asked the opinions of executives who had attended programs at 26 top business schools, and of corporate customers of university-based executive-education programs.

A glimpse at the table shows that Harvard business school, with $26.8 million in annual revenues, boasts the biggest business in executive education. But several of its competitors, such as Michigan, Wharton, Duke,and France's INSEAD, have gained considerable ground in the past five years--not only in revenues but also in prestige.

The report-card grades measure the schools by specific categories in both the surveys. To judge "payback," for example, we asked executives four key questions: Was the program worth the time and cost? Was it immediately useful on the job? Would it help in their long-term development? Could they shoulder greater responsibility as a result of the experience?

The top 20% of schools in each category received As. The next 25% got Bs, and the next 30% Cs. The remaining schools got Ds. For more detail on the ranking process, see page 114. Want to bone up on the latest in marketing or operations? Need help in making the transition to general management after years in finance? Or simply want the newest thinking on global competition? BUSINESS WEEK's ranking of B-school programs for executives sheds some light on where to go.

The programs range from two-day seminars on such topics as customer satisfaction to 11-week-long sessions on general management. To create the guide, we asked the opinions of executives who had attended programs at 26 top business schools, and of corporate customers of university-based executive-education programs.

A glimpse at the table shows that Harvard business school, with $26.8 million in annual revenues, boasts the biggest business in executive education. But several of its competitors, such as Michigan, Wharton, Duke,and France's INSEAD, have gained considerable ground in the past five years -- not only in revenues but also in prestige.

The report-card grades measure the schools by specific categories in both the surveys. To judge "payback," for example, we asked executives four key questions: Was the program worth the time and cost? Was it immediately useful on the job? Would it help in their long-term development? Could they shoulder greater responsibility as a result of the experience?

The top 20% of schools in each category received As. The next 25% got Bs, and the next 30% Cs. The remaining schools got Ds. For more detail on the ranking process, see page 114.


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