Five IT Habits You Should Break

Posted by: Today's Tip Contributor on October 1, 2010

Old habits die hard. Making technology decisions based on long-standing practices is easier than discovering things have changed. Several upsides of this downturned economy, however, are greater choices and new opportunities to save money when buying networking equipment and services. There’s never been a better time to break these five bad IT habits:

1. Repeatedly getting competitive quotes from the same vendors. Relying on bids from only primary market vendors ignores viable alternatives. Many choices for purchasing top-quality equipment exist, thanks in part to a burgeoning market for pre-owned gear. Both refurbished and factory-sealed equipment are widely available and significantly cheaper than original equipment manufacturer (OEM) prices.

2. Accepting OEMs’ short upgrade cycles. Instead of upgrading every 18 months to accommodate OEM hardware refreshes, extend the life of existing equipment. Even when OEMs discontinue sale or support, the secondary market provides replacements and service.

3. Keeping decommissioned equipment in a closet. Instead of wasting valuable space, consider asset recovery to maximize the value of outdated or surplus assets.

4. Overpaying for maintenance. OEMs offer one-size-fits-all programs, but the level of coverage needed varies with the equipment, age, and role in the network. Assess needs for each item, and pay only for required maintenance.

5. Protecting only core network assets. Don’t leave your network vulnerable by protecting only business-critical assets. Alternative maintenance options provide economical, broader coverage.

Creative sourcing strategies for equipment procurement and maintenance are becoming more prevalent. Forge some new habits to stretch your budget in this tight economy and gain market share.

Mike Sheldon
President and chief executive
Network Hardware Resale
Santa Barbara, Calif.

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