Writing an Ad for Search Engines

Posted by: Rod Kurtz on August 13, 2007

Every day people search on Google, Yahoo, MSN and other search engines for products and services like yours. Many search engines allow you to advertise on the search results pages. Search engine advertising can place your site at the top of these pages.

If you’re going to spend money promoting your business on such search engines, then you owe it to yourself to spend a little energy on your ads. Here’s what you need to consider when writing ads for the search engine results pages:

1. Title. Make the title of your ad relevant to what your audience searched for. If you sell remote support software, your ad may perform better if its title is "Remote Support Software."

2. Filter Clicks. Remember that you’re paying per click, so you should do all you can to filter out "bad" clicks. If, for example, you sell a premium product, putting a dollar amount in your ad will filter out clicks from people who can’t afford what you sell.

3. Prepare Your Audience. You probably want something from the people who clicked on your ad. Maybe you want them to download, watch, buy, or sign up for something. Your ad will perform better if you disclose in the ad what it is you want them to do when they get to your page. So use words like "Sign up," "Download," “Register for," or "Purchase" in your ad.

4. Don’t Drop Everyone Off at the Home Page. Your ad leads to a page on your Web site. This page is called a “landing page.” If you really want your ad to perform well, you should strive to make your landing pages consistent with your ad. If the ad says "Sign up for a free 7-day trial," the landing page should say something about a "7-day trial" and have a sign-up form on it.

This kind of consistency takes time and focus, but it will put your search engine marketing campaign one step ahead of your competitors’.

Justin Brock
Manager of eCommerce
Bomgar Corporation
Ridgeland, Miss.

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