http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-01-10/verizon-to-face-backup-power-requirement-on-911-calling

Bloomberg News

Verizon to Face Backup Power Requirement on 911 Calling

January 10, 2013

Carriers including Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ:US) didn’t follow their own procedures for backup power and system design, causing 911 emergency-calling service to fail for more than 2 million people after storms last June, U.S. regulators said.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski, in an e-mailed statement accompanying an agency report issued today, said he will seek rules to strengthen 911 service.

“These failures are unacceptable and the FCC will do whatever is necessary to ensure the reliability of 911,” Genachowski said, without announcing a date for agency action.

Emergency calls were disrupted in parts of six states after storms with powerful winds, called derechos, hammered the eastern U.S. on June 29, knocking out commercial power.

In Fairfax County, Virginia, almost 1,900 calls to 911 weren’t routed to emergency operators in a 29-hour period after backup generators failed at a Verizon office, according to a report today from the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.

The FCC may consider stronger backup-power requirements for central telephone offices, more tests of 911 circuits, and better designs so a single point of failure doesn’t cripple wide areas of service, according to the report.

“Too many of us were left without communications and could not reach 911,” Jessica Rosenworcel, an FCC commissioner, said in an e-mailed statement. “We have a duty to find out what went wrong and to apply those lessons to make our networks more resilient.”

Cascading Failures

The agency’s report traced a cascading series of failures after generators didn’t work properly in two Verizon offices in Washington’s northern Virginia suburbs, cutting 911 service in four jurisdictions. Fairfax County resorted to a Twitter message the morning of June 30 telling its 1.1 million residents to “go to the nearest police or fire station to report emergencies,” according to a county report submitted to the FCC in August.

Seventeen public-safety call centers serving more than 2 million people in three states failed entirely, and some 911 service, such as location identification, was lost at 77 call centers in six states serving 3.6 million people, according to the FCC report.

‘Substantial Progress’

New York-based Verizon has corrected the cause of the generator problems in northern Virginia, Anthony Melone, Verizon executive vice president and chief technology officer, said in an e-mail today.

“We have acted diligently and decisively to resolve the operational and communications issues that arose,” Melone said. “Our performance during Hurricane Sandy in late October demonstrated the substantial progress we’ve made.”

June’s storms caused greater havoc on emergency calls than Hurricane Sandy, which left most 911 services intact, according to the FCC.

Hurricane Sandy knocked out mobile service in parts of 10 states and the District of Columbia, generating fresh questions about ways to keep wireless networks working when disasters hit. Telephone companies went to court and blocked backup power rules for mobile phone sites that the FCC proposed in 2007, after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans.

In today’s report, the FCC didn’t propose backup power for wireless telephone service. The agency has set a hearing on Sandy outages for Feb. 5 in Manhattan and Hoboken, New Jersey.

Areas suffering 911 disruptions after the June storms included West Virginia, where service is provided by Frontier Communications Corp. (FTR:US), and Ohio, where service is provided by Frontier, AT&T Inc. (T:US) and CenturyLink Inc. (CTL:US), the FCC said.

Generator Maintenance

Since the storm, Frontier has invested in its network to improve disaster preparedness and will “carefully study” the FCC’s report, Executive Vice President Kathleen Abernathy said in a statement released on Business Wire by the Stamford, Connecticut-based carrier.

Verizon generators in northern Virginia didn’t start automatically when power failed and may not have been properly maintained, according to a preliminary report by the Virginia State Corporation Commission, a state regulator.

In the report, the state agency’s staff said the “unprecedented” 911 system failures shouldn’t have happened.

Loss of 911 service didn’t cause catastrophic consequences for anybody in northern Virginia, according to the state report.

To contact the reporter on this story: Todd Shields in Washington at tshields3@bloomberg.net;

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Bernard Kohn at bkohn2@bloomberg.net


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