Bloomberg Anywhere Login

Bloomberg

Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world.

Company

Financial Products

Enterprise Products

Media

Customer Support

  • Americas

    +1 212 318 2000

  • Europe, Middle East, & Africa

    +44 20 7330 7500

  • Asia Pacific

    +65 6212 1000

Communications

Industry Products

Media Services

Follow Us

http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2003-11-23/table-the-weapons-against-aids

Magazine

Table: The Weapons Against AIDS


Companies are devising clever new approaches to keep HIV in check

1 For the virus to enter a cell, it must first attach to two receptors, or docking ports, on the cell. A drug delivered straight to such sites might thwart the virus before it docks. One type of drug in development seeks to block a receptor called CCR5. Another is aimed at the CD4 receptor.

2 If the virus attaches to the cell, it uncoils a harpoon-like device that plunges into the cell wall to force entry. So-called fusion inhibitor drugs keep the uncoiling from taking place.

3 After the virus gets in, it replicates by inserting its genes into the cell's chromosomes. This requires an enzyme called integrase. Drugs that disable integrase could prevent replication.


LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW
 
blog comments powered by Disqus