TIPSHEET: BEST PRACTICES
NEVER WAIT FOR DAY ONE
Getting started before your job officially begins can help make the first day feel more like the 15th. Hold one-on-one meetings with key reports and customers, create a strategic agenda for the first 100 days, and carefully study the company and its financials.
UNEARTH NEW STORIES
In those early meetings, ferret out lesser-known anecdotes about the new company you can share when trying to illustrate a point. Telling tales about your former company will only alienate your new colleagues.
THINK IN THREES
It’s easy for new leaders to get overwhelmed by all the goals they set—and confuse people in the process. Three broad themes, says Spencer Stuart recruiter James Citrin, are easy for people to remember, and help clarify and organize priorities.
FIND YOUR “SHADOW BOARD”
New leaders should quickly ascertain who the people are that their boss will turn to for perspective on them. Fail to impress those people, and “they can bury you,” says onboarding consultant George Bradt.
MAP OUT QUICK WINS
Don’t plan on a honeymoon. Early on, come up with a few important but easy-to-reach goals you can point out to the board, Wall Street, or employees as proof of what you or the organization can achieve.

From 0 to 60 in 100 Days

By Jena McGregor

Don't plan on hiring an "onboarding" specialist? Here are ideas for a great start from consultants who help senior executives switch into new jobs:



Read:How to Take the Reins At Top Speed

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