Bloomberg News

Boeing Hikes 20-Year Pilot-Hiring Forecast 8.3% as Airlines Grow

August 29, 2013

Boeing Co. (BA:US), the world’s largest aerospace manufacturer, predicts global airlines will need to hire 498,000 new pilots to keep pace with aircraft orders over the next 20 years, 8.3 percent more than it forecast a year ago.

The hiring will be greatest among Asian carriers, which will need to recruit 192,300 pilots through 2032, Chicago-based Boeing said in a study released today. That’s 3.6 percent more than the planemaker predicted in its 2012 forecast.

Pilot training among the region’s rapidly growing carriers has been in the spotlight as U.S. crash investigators examine the manual flying skills and cockpit teamwork of pilots guiding an Asiana Airlines Inc. jet that crashed in San Francisco in July.

“The urgent demand for competent aviation personnel is a global issue that is here now and is very real,” Sherry Carbary, vice president of Boeing Flight Services, said in a statement.

The report comes as Boeing opens its training center for pilots of its 787 Dreamliner today at Miami’s international airport. The transfer of the training center from the Seattle area will result in the loss of about 34 union jobs, said Bill Dugovich, spokesman for the 26,000-member Professional Aerospace Union, known as SPEEA.

Boeing predicts airlines will hire 556,000 maintenance technicians over the next two decades, 7.5 percent fewer than a year ago, as carriers retire aging aircraft in favor of new models that require fewer overhauls.

To contact the reporters on this story: Julie Johnsson in Chicago at jjohnsson@bloomberg.net; Bill Faries in Miami at wfaries@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Ed Dufner at edufner@bloomberg.net


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