Bloomberg News

Bosman Lawyer Takes Complaint on UEFA Finance Rules to Court

June 20, 2013

A player agent today filed a complaint at a Belgian court about European soccer finance rules that aim to stop teams such as Paris Saint Germain and Manchester City spending more than their income.

Daniel Striani, who also lodged a complaint with the European Commission on May 6, said European soccer governing body UEFA’s rules infringe European Union competition law and the right to free movement of workers, service and capital, according to a statement distributed by the office of his lawyer Jean-Louis Dupont.

In a landmark case, Dupont successfully overturned rules on player transfers in 1995 on behalf of Belgian player Jean-Marc Bosman.

Striani’s complaint today was filed at the Court of First Instance in Brussels, the statement said. He argues the so-called Financial Fair Play rules would decrease the income of agents by reducing the number of players that clubs hire, and reducing player salaries.

Nyon, Switzerland-based UEFA said in a May 6 statement the rules aim to guarantee the “long-term” stability of European soccer and are in line with EU law.

Under the breakeven rule, clubs with a loss of more than 5 million euros ($6.6 million) last season or this season risk exclusion from next season’s Champions League and Europa League, the continent’s top club competitions. Clubs can have a loss of up to 45 million euros a season if shareholders cover the loss. The UEFA regulations don’t apply to domestic championships.

Manchester City, the 2012 English champion, is owned by Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan of Abu Dhabi and French league champion Paris Saint-Germain is controlled by the Qatar Investment Authority.

To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Duff in Madrid at aduff4@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at at celser@bloomberg.net


Burger King's Young Buns
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW

(enter your email)
(enter up to 5 email addresses, separated by commas)

Max 250 characters

 
blog comments powered by Disqus