Bloomberg News

San Francisco Mayor Asks Bars to Curb Super Bowl Drinking

January 30, 2013

With his city’s National Football League team favored to win the Super Bowl and celebrations primed, San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee is urging bartenders to voluntarily curb alcohol service and calling for revelers to drink in moderation on game day.

People should know their limits as they cheer the San Francisco 49ers when they face the Baltimore Ravens in New Orleans on Feb. 3, Lee told reporters.

“They ought to just be cognizant that an overindulgence in a celebratory way could be very hurtful to communities and to themselves,” said Lee, 60, following a speech Jan. 28. “It goes both ways -- people who serve as well as people who drink. While we may have that great opportunity to celebrate, let’s keep it within bounds.”

A San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency bus was set on fire as people celebrated in the streets after the San Francisco Giants won Major League Baseball’s World Series in October. The bus was destroyed, costing the city almost $1 million, said Paul Rose, a spokesman for the service.

“We expect a peaceful Sunday, but will be ready for anything,” Rose said by e-mail. “On an as-needed basis, we will reroute service to avoid any upcoming problem areas to keep employees and passengers as safe as possible.”

The city police department isn’t allowing officers to take that day off, said Officer Carlos Manfredi, a spokesman. He declined to say how many will be on duty.

Celebration ‘Outbreaks’

“We’ll be fully staffed on Sunday in preparation for any outbreaks of celebration,” Manfredi said. “We will have units ready to respond to any hotspots and we’ll address those issues appropriately.”

Yesterday, the mayor encouraged 49ers fans “to frequent their neighborhood establishments to watch the Super Bowl game, and no matter what the outcome, to treat our city with dignity and respect.”

In Baltimore, home of the Ravens, the city isn’t asking for any restriction on alcohol sales, said Ian Brennan, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

“We’re asking people to be responsible and courteous whatever the outcome is,” Brennan said.

“We don’t have a recent history of very unruly activity,” he said. “In the last two rounds of the NFL playoffs, we had people pouring out of bars and restaurants into the streets and it was mostly so strangers can hug and high-five.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Alison Vekshin in San Francisco at avekshin@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Stephen Merelman in New York at smerelman@bloomberg.net.


Best LBO Ever
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW
 
blog comments powered by Disqus