Bloomberg News

New York City May Be Bypassed by Next Northeast Storm

January 22, 2013

A snowstorm forecast for the U.S. East Coast at the end of the week may be more of a miss than a blow for New York City.

The system has a 50 percent chance of bringing snow to the city after noon on Jan. 25, according to the National Weather Service in Upton, New York. While that may cause some minor travel delays, there probably won’t be much accumulation, said Rob St. Pierre, a meteorologist with Hometown Forecast Services in Nashua, New Hampshire.

“The system doesn’t look like it’s going to get going until it’s too far to the east,” St. Pierre said by telephone. “It doesn’t look like a major problem.”

Computer forecast models show the storm sweeping south of New York City before it intensifies off the coast of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. That track would mean perhaps 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) of snow in the mid-Atlantic states and some accumulation in Massachusetts while New York is left mostly dry, St. Pierre said.

Since the storm is still three days away, it must be watched because the track might change, he said.

In the meantime, Chicago and the Midwest are in the grip of a deep freeze.

The high temperature in Chicago today is expected to reach only 9 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 13 Celsius), according to the weather service. The temperature at O’Hare International Airport was 3 as of 11 a.m. local time.

Tomorrow, temperatures in Chicago are expected to rise to a high of 23 with a chance of snow flurries.

The frigid air also has a hold on southern Canada. The temperature in Toronto was 7 degrees Fahrenheit at noon and is expected to remain below freezing for the rest of the week, according to Environment Canada.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net


We Almost Lost the Nasdaq
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW

(enter your email)
(enter up to 5 email addresses, separated by commas)

Max 250 characters

 
blog comments powered by Disqus