Bloomberg News

Melky Cabrera Gets $377,003 MLB Playoff Share Even With Drug Ban

November 26, 2012

Former San Francisco Giants Outfielder Melky Cabrera

Melky Cabrera of the San Francisco Giants scores against the New York Mets in San Francisco on Aug. 2, 2012. Cabrera was banned for 50 games on Aug. 15 after testing positive for testosterone. Photographer: Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

Former San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera will receive a full postseason share of $377,003 after the World Series-winning team opted not to use him in the playoffs following a 50-game drug ban.

The Giants, who swept the Detroit Tigers in four games last month to win their second World Series in three years, awarded 50 full shares out of a $23.5 million players’ pool, 11.1 partial shares and 12 cash awards, Major League Baseball said in a statement. The $377,003 payout was a record. Full shares paid to Tigers’ players were worth $284,275.

Cabrera was an All-Star who was batting .346 when he was banned for 50 games on Aug. 15 after testing positive for testosterone. He was reinstated to the Giants’ 40-man roster on Oct. 12, though the team chose not to include him on their active lists for the National League Championship Series, which began Oct. 14, and the World Series.

Under baseball’s Rule 45 on eligibility, Cabrera was automatically awarded a full share because he was on the roster after June 1 and eligible to participate in the World Series.

Cabrera signed a two-year contract with the Toronto Blue Jays this month. The deal is worth $16 million, according to the New York Post.

The postseason players’ pool, which went to 10 teams, was $65,363,469, derived from 50 percent of gate receipts from wild- card games and 60 percent of gate receipts from the other series.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mason Levinson in New York at mlevinson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net


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