Bloomberg News

ECB’s Weidmann Says Banking Union Can’t Solve Debt Crisis

November 19, 2012

European Central Bank Governing Council member Jens Weidmann said a banking union can’t solve the euro-area debt crisis.

“Done correctly, a banking union can be an important building block, even a pillar of a stable monetary union,” Weidmann, who heads Germany’s Bundesbank, said in a speech in Frankfurt today. “But is it also the key to finding a solution to the crisis? No, it’s not, and we shouldn’t overburden it with this expectation.”

European leaders in June agreed to hand the ECB powers to oversee all 6,000 euro-area banks as part of a so-called banking union that would unlock joint recapitalization funds for the region’s ailing lenders. Weidmann said the banking union shouldn’t take responsibility for legacy risks and debts.

“The current problems in the banking system are above all a result of past mistakes on the national level,” he said. “Balance-sheet risks that occurred under national responsibility must also be overcome by the respective member state.”

To spread these risks via a banking union would amount to fiscal transfers and contradict the purpose and justification for the banking union, Weidmann said, adding such a course could reduce the incentive for countries to reform their banking systems.

The banking system needs to be better protected from the effects of the debt crisis, he said, proposing that the banking union be flanked by other regulatory measures.

“Two are particularly important to me,” Weidmann said. “First, there should be a limit on lending to sovereigns for each bank. Second, banks should have capital buffers that take into account the risk of their sovereign debt or lending to the state.”

Banks can currently hold sovereign debt without setting aside capital for it because it is still treated as risk- free.

To contact the reporters on this story: Stefan Riecher in Frankfurt at sriecher@bloomberg.net; Gabi Thesing in Frankfurt at gthesing@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Craig Stirling at cstirling1@bloomberg.net


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