Bloomberg News

Haslingden Stepping Down as President of News Corp.’s Fox

August 15, 2012

Fox Networks President and Chief Operating Officer David Haslingden will step down at the end of the year to return to his native Australia, the latest management change before parent News Corp. (NWSA:US) splits in two.

Haslingden, 50, who has served as president of Fox Networks since January 2011, plans to spend more time with his family, News Corp. said today in a statement.

“My family is by far my greatest love, and being away from them for almost two years is long enough,” Haslingden said in the statement. “I’m delighted to be on my way home.”

News Corp. has made a number of executive changes since announcing in June plans to split into separate publishing and entertainment businesses. The company, led by Rupert Murdoch, named Peter Rice chairman and chief executive officer of its television business and moved David Hill from the head of Fox Sports to a senior role in the corporate office in July.

Haslingden, who reported to Rice, helped expand News Corp.’s international TV business to more than 350 channels in over 55 countries, the company said. He oversaw business development, finance, legal, ad sales and corporate functions, according to the January 2011 announcement of his appointment.

“Since joining News Corporation, David has been a driving force in the evolution of the pay-TV industry in every corner of the world,” Chase Carey, News Corp.’s president and chief operating officer, said in the statement.

News Corp. rose 0.4 percent to $23.40 at the close in New York. The Class A shares have gained (NWSA:US) 31 percent this year.

To contact the reporter on this story: Edmund Lee in New York at elee310@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net


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  • NWSA
    (News Corp)
    • $17.06 USD
    • 0.02
    • 0.12%
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