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McIlroy Wins PGA by Record 8 Shots for 2nd Major Golf Title

August 12, 2012

McIlroy Wins PGA by Record 8 Shots for 2nd Major Golf Title

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland holds up the Wanamaker Trophy after winning the 94th PGA Championship at the Ocean Course in Kiawah Island, South Carolina on August 12, 2012. Photographer: David Cannon/Getty Images

Rory McIlroy had six birdies in a bogey-free final round of 66 to win the PGA Championship by a record eight shots, adding a second career Grand Slam title to go with his 2011 U.S. Open victory.

McIlroy, a 23-year-old from Northern Ireland, is four months younger than Tiger Woods was when he captured his second major at the 1999 PGA Championship.

McIlroy’s eight-stroke win at the Ocean Course in Kiawah Island, South Carolina, broke Jack Nicklaus’s record victory margin of seven over Andy Bean in 1980 as the largest in the history of the golf season’s final major championship. McIlroy finished with a score of 13-under-par 275, while Englishman David Lynn was second at 5 under.

“It’s been an incredible week,” McIlroy said before he received the Wanamaker Trophy. “I had a good feeling about it at the start. To look at the names on that trophy and to put my name alongside them is very special.”

The win is the seventh of McIlroy’s career and second of the 2012 season, following victory at the Honda Classic in March. It returns him to the No. 1 spot in the golf’s Official World Ranking and erases disappointing performances in golf’s three other majors this season.

McIlroy entered the third day of April’s Masters tournament one shot off the lead, only to finish 40th after a 5-over 77 in the third round. He missed the cut in the U.S. Open at the Olympic Club in San Francisco in June and finished 60th at last month’s British Open.

First Major

McIlroy’s first major title -- at the 2011 U.S. Open -- came after he blew a four-shot final-round lead at that year’s Masters by closing with an 8-over 80. Two months later at Congressional Country Club in Maryland, the then 22-year-old McIlroy won the U.S. Open by eight strokes with the lowest score in tournament history.

McIlroy began the final 18 holes today with a three-stroke lead over Sweden’s Carl Pettersson.

After nine holes, England’s Ian Poulter had pulled within two shots of the lead before faltering with three straight bogeys, giving McIlroy a six-shot cushion with six holes remaining. Poulter finished with four bogeys over his final six holes, while McIlroy pulled away.

McIlroy took 24 putts in the final round, including a birdie putt of more than 20 feet on the 18th hole for his second eight-stroke romp in a major championship. Woods won his first two majors -- the 1997 Masters and 1999 PGA Championship -- by a combined 13 strokes.

Phenomenal Putting

“I got off to a bit of a shaky start,” McIlroy said. “I had a bit of a pill on the second, but I was able to make birdie and from there I settled into it a little bit. I thought my putting today was phenomenal.”

Woods, 36, a four-time PGA Championship winner, finished 11 shots behind McIlroy after entering the third round tied for the lead. His even-par 72 in the final round followed a 2-over 74 in the rain-delayed third round. Woods didn’t break par in a weekend round at a major this season and hasn’t won a major title since the 2008 U.S. Open.

Woods said his chances of winning the tournament were derailed during the third round when he made bogeys on four of the first eight holes. He went from tied atop the leaderboard after 36 holes to five strokes off the lead heading into the final round.

Tie for 11th

“I was trying to enjoy it, enjoy the process of it,” Woods said. “But that’s not how I play. I play full systems go, all out, intense, and that’s how I won 14 of these things.”

Woods tied for 11th at 2 under par.

The 38-year-old Lynn, who won once on the European Tour, shot back-to-back rounds of 68 on the weekend to climb into second place. Pettersson, Poulter, Justin Rose and Keegan Bradley tied for third at 4 under.

“You know, he was just better than everybody, and it was clear to everybody I think,” Pettersson said of McIlroy. “He drives it long, straight, hits his irons great, and he chipped and putted awesome. He made every clutch putt out there.”

McIlroy is the first golfer from Northern Ireland to win the PGA Championship and the first from the United Kingdom to capture the season’s final major since Tommy Armour in 1930. His victory ended a streak of 16 different major champions dating back to Padraig Harrington’s win at the 2008 PGA Championship.

‘Pretty Impressive

“We all know the talent he has,” Woods said. “He went through a little spell this year, and I think that was good for him. We all go through those spells in our careers. He’s got all the talent in the world and this is the way that Rory can play. When he gets it going, it’s pretty impressive to watch.”

The tournament was the first major played at the Ocean Course, a Pete Dye-built venue amid sand dunes alongside the Atlantic Ocean. The course hosted the 1991 Ryder Cup matches between Europe and the U.S., and the 2007 Senior PGA Championship.

Heavy rain soaked the course early in the week and a late- day thunderstorm yesterday forced the third round to be completed today.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mike Buteau in Atlanta at mbuteau@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net


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