Bloomberg News

New Blast of Heat May Move Into U.S. East Next Week

July 10, 2012

A quick blast of heat may return to Chicago, Washington and New York City next week, pushing temperatures into the 80s and 90s and sending people to their air conditioners for relief.

The mid-Atlantic and Northeast may have temperatures 5 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit (2.8 to 3.9 Celsius) above normal from July 15 to July 19, according to MDA EarthSat Weather in Gaithersburg, Maryland. It may be hotter in the western Great Lakes and Chicago.

“The forecast has shifted hotter today to include widespread mid-90s across the Midwest and mid-Atlantic, and upper 80s or greater in the Northeast,” MDA said. “At this point, the next round of heat doesn’t appear as strong as the last, but there may still be some upside from the current forecast.”

Natural gas futures climbed 3.9 percent yesterday, the biggest increase since June 18, on the possibility of higher temperatures in the U.S. large cities. Heat increases electricity demand, and that can boost prices on the spot energy markets. Gas makes up about 32 percent of U.S. electricity generation.

Forecasters are split on what sort of conditions may prevail later in July.

MDA predicts temperatures in the Midwest and Northeast will stay about 4 degrees above normal from July 20 to July 24. Commodity Weather Group LLC President Matt Rogers forecast that the eastern U.S. will be primarily seasonal during the period, while Chicago and the Great Plains may be about 5 degrees above normal.

For July 10, the normal average temperature in New York City is 77, according to MDA. It’s 73 in Boston; 80 in Washington; 80 in Atlanta; 75 in Chicago; 84 in Houston; 65 in Seattle and 74 in Burbank, California.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net


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