Bloomberg News

Rupiah Trades Near Four-Week High on Fund Inflows; Bonds Steady

July 04, 2012

Indonesia’s rupiah traded near a four-week high as speculation central banks will ease monetary policy in the world’s biggest economies spurred demand for emerging-market assets. Government bonds were steady.

Global funds bought $94 million more local shares than they sold in the last two days and added 590 billion rupiah ($63 million) to their government bond holdings on July 2, data show. The MSCI Asia-Pacific Index (MXAP) rallied to near a two-month high as economists forecast the European Central Bank will reduce borrowing costs tomorrow. China may cut banks’ reserve- requirement ratios three more times in 2012, Shanghai Securities News reported on its website, citing a report released by the China Banking Association today.

“We might be seeing foreigners return to the stock market, with slower inflows into the bond market, as optimism returns,” said Billie Fuliangsahar, the Jakarta-based head of treasury at PT Rabobank International Indonesia. “There is still some demand for dollars left over from last month, with corporates needing to make payments, so the moves may be limited.”

The rupiah traded at 9,361 per dollar as of 3:23 p.m. in Jakarta, after closing at 9,363 yesterday, according to prices from local banks compiled by Bloomberg. The currency touched 9,334 earlier, the highest since June 7.

One-month implied volatility, which measures exchange-rate swings used to price options, declined 25 basis points, or 0.25 percentage point, to 8.25 percent today.

The yield on the government’s 7 percent bonds due May 2022 was little changed at 6.07 percent, the lowest level since May 4, according to prices from the Inter Dealer Market Association.

To contact the reporter on this story: Yudith Ho in Singapore at yho35@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Sandy Hendry at shendry@bloomberg.net


Burger King's Young Buns
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW

(enter your email)
(enter up to 5 email addresses, separated by commas)

Max 250 characters

 
blog comments powered by Disqus