Bloomberg News

Singapore’s Fuel Stockpiles Rise 1% From Last Week

May 31, 2012

Singapore’s total oil-product inventories rose 1 percent.

Inventories in Asia’s biggest oil-trading center rose 369 thousand barrels to 37,837 thousand barrels in the week ended yesterday, said International Enterprise Singapore, a unit of the trade ministry. The agency didn’t give a reason for the increase.

The following table provides a weekly comparison of the oil inventories for six weeks. Inventory figures are in thousands of barrels.

==========================================================================

May.30 May.23 May.16 May.9 May.2 Apr.25

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 ==========================================================================

----------------- Thousand barrels ------------------ Total 37,837 37,468 38,696 40,089 38,553 38,443 Light distillates 8,749 8,740 9,585 10,208 10,396 10,384 Middle distillates 8,733 9,832 10,740 10,010 8,928 8,828 Residues 20,355 18,896 18,371 19,871 19,229 19,231 --------------------------------------------------------------------------

==========================================================================

May.30 May.23 May.16 May.9 May.2 Apr.25

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 ==========================================================================

----------- Weekly change (’000 barrels) ------------ Total 369 -1,228 -1,393 1,536 110 508 Light distillates 9 -845 -623 -188 12 -340 Middle distillates -1,099 -908 730 1,082 100 -1,989 Residues 1,459 525 -1,500 642 -2 2,837

-------------- Weekly change (Percent) -------------- Total 1.0% -3.2% -3.5% 4.0% 0.3% 1.3% Light distillates 0.1% -8.8% -6.1% -1.8% 0.1% -3.2% Middle distillates -11.2% -8.5% 7.3% 12.1% 1.1% -18.4% Residues 7.7% 2.9% -7.5% 3.3% 0.0% 17.3% ========================================================================== Note: Light distillates include naphtha, processed from crude oil and turned into chemicals and plastics. It does not include gases. Residues include fuel oil, which is used as ship fuel and burned by power plants to generate electricity. Residues excludes bitumen.

Source: International Enterprise Singapore


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