Bloomberg News

Boston Marathon Runners Facing Record Heat

April 16, 2012

Runners during the start of the 115th Boston Marathon on April 18, 2011 in Hopkinton, Massachusetts. Photographer: Elsa/Getty Images

Runners during the start of the 115th Boston Marathon on April 18, 2011 in Hopkinton, Massachusetts. Photographer: Elsa/Getty Images

Not a rain check, it’s a heat check for the Boston Marathon.

Runners have been told they can stay home from today’s race, temperatures more than 30 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, and come back next year when it should be cooler.

Boston Marathon officials and the Mayor Tom Menino made the offer with temperature expected to reach 88 degrees (31 Celsius) today in Boston and along much of the 26.2-mile (42.2-kilometer) race’s route. That would make it the hottest day of the year so far and set a record for April 16, according to the National Weather Service in Taunton.

The race is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, and end in Boston, with the fastest male runners covering the route in just over two hours.

Menino offered the option yesterday at the traditional pre- race pasta dinner at City Hall Plaza. The Boston Athletic Association, which organizes and oversees the world’s oldest continuous marathon, gave runners instructions on the deferment on its headquarters voicemail.

The last time the BAA offered the choice was 2010, when a volcano erupted in Iceland, stalling air traffic and stranding at least 300 runners who were coming from overseas.

The normal high temperature for today in the Boston area is 55 degrees, according to the weather service. The record for the day is 82 degrees set in 1976.

The last time the temperature reached 88 was on Aug. 19, with 87 recorded on Oct. 9, according to the weather service.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net.


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