Bloomberg News

Tennis-Ball-Size Hail May Hit Oklahoma, N. Texas

April 09, 2012

Volunteers Miguel Pichardo, left, and John Allen help a friend search for personal belongings following a tornado in Forney, Texas on April 4, 2012. Tornadoes and hail struck the Dallas area last week, causing the cancellation of more than 1,900 flights and damaging aircraft at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. Photographer: Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Volunteers Miguel Pichardo, left, and John Allen help a friend search for personal belongings following a tornado in Forney, Texas on April 4, 2012. Tornadoes and hail struck the Dallas area last week, causing the cancellation of more than 1,900 flights and damaging aircraft at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. Photographer: Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Severe thunderstorms, possibly accompanied by tennis ball-sized hail, are expected across western Oklahoma and may move into northern Texas, according to the National Weather Service.

Oklahoma today has a moderate risk of severe storms with a 45 percent chance of hail and 5 percent chance of tornadoes, said the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma.

“Large hail and damaging winds will be the main threats, although a couple of tornadoes cannot be ruled out,” the weather service said in a hazardous weather statement.

There’s also a severe risk of damaging systems in parts of Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas from April 12 to April 14, according to the storm center.

In March, 223 tornadoes were reported in the U.S., compared with a normal for the month of 80, according a report issued today by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Tornadoes and hail struck the Dallas area last week, causing the cancellation of more than 1,900 flights and damaging aircraft at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

A tornado outbreak March 2 and March 3 across the Ohio Valley and the Southeast killed at least 40 people and caused more than $1.5 billion in damage, according to NOAA. It was the first time this year that a weather-related incident caused more than $1 billion in losses. Last year, the U.S. had 14 such disasters, according to NOAA.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net


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