Bloomberg News

Two Killed by Suspected Sect Members in Nigeria, Police Say

April 01, 2012

A Nigerian local government council chairman was one of two people killed in attacks by gunmen suspected to be members of a religious sect in the northern part of the country, police spokesmen said.

The unidentified gunmen, suspected to be members of Boko Haram, killed Wanangu Kachuwa, chairman of the Chibok local government, after he returned from church today in Maiduguri, the capital of Nigeria’s Borno state, police spokesman Samuel Tizhe said.

A member of the sect was killed in neighboring Yobe state during attacks by the group on two police stations there yesterday, Toyin Gbadegesin, spokesman for police in the state, said by phone today from Potiskum, the capital. Two policemen were injured in the attacks there, as the suspected sect members burnt the police stations, Gbadegesin said.

Nigeria’s government blames Boko Haram, a militant Islamic group influenced by the Taliban movement, for a spate of violence since last year that has targeted government buildings and security forces. The group claimed responsibility for an Aug. 26 suicide car-bomb attack on a United Nations building that killed 23 people in the capital, Abuja.

Nigeria, Africa’s top oil producer, is split between a mainly Muslim north and a predominantly Christian south. More than 14,000 people died in ethnic and religious clashes in the West African nation between 1999 and 2009, according to the Brussels-based International Crisis Group.

Ten people died in a security force raid on a bomb factory operated by the Boko Haram Islamist group in Nigeria, the British Broadcasting Corp. reported today.

To contact the reporter on this story: Gbenga Akingbule in Maiduguri at gakingbule@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Antony Sguazzin at asguazzin@bloomberg.net.


We Almost Lost the Nasdaq
LIMITED-TIME OFFER SUBSCRIBE NOW

(enter your email)
(enter up to 5 email addresses, separated by commas)

Max 250 characters

 
blog comments powered by Disqus