Bloomberg News

SEC Names Conley Deputy General Counsel for Litigation, Appeals

October 04, 2011

Oct. 4 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission named Michael Conley, an 11-year veteran of the agency, deputy general counsel for enforcement matters, appellate cases and adjudication.

Conley, 48, is taking over the position from Anne Small, who left the SEC to take a position at the White House, the agency said today in a statement. He was promoted from deputy solicitor, a position he has held since 2009.

Conley, who will be one of two deputies reporting to General Counsel Mark Cahn, will work on litigation of enforcement matters, challenges to agency rules and appeals of sanctions meted out by self-regulatory organizations, including the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the SEC said.

“Michael is a spectacular lawyer who will bring to his new position an extraordinary breadth of experience,” Cahn, who took the helm after David Becker stepped down in February, said in the agency’s statement.

While serving as deputy solicitor, Conley was involved with the SEC’s positions regarding bankruptcies, including that of Bernard Madoff’s firm, and the Securities Investor Protection Corp., the federally chartered nonprofit that works to restore funds to customers when brokerages collapse.

After graduating first in his class from Boston University’s law school in 1989, Conley was a law clerk for Judge Abner J. Mikva of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and later worked for Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun, the SEC said. He graduated from Iona College in 1984, and was editor-in-chief of the Boston University Law Review.

--Editors: Gregory Mott, Maura Reynolds

To contact the reporter on this story: Joshua Gallu in Washington at jgallu@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Lawrence Roberts at lroberts13@bloomberg.net


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