Election 2008

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CEOs on Presidential Priorities

Executives from Dow Chemical, salesforce.com, and other companies on what Barack Obama's top priorities should be to help businesses and the economy

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News

The Changes Business Wants from Obama

Corporate executives discuss measures—from finance and taxation to energy and tech—that would help U.S. companies survive and thrive

Taxes: It's Time for Compromise

Business leaders say Obama's plan to end the tax deferment for overseas corporate profits will stymie growth

Energy: Lay Out Clean Rules—and Fast

With carbon restrictions likely soon, business wants the new President to lay out the rules. And quickly

Teams: Picking a Posse to Fix the Economy

The President-elect's first task will be building an economic team. His Treasury Secretary choice, expected in a couple of weeks, will set the stage for later selections

Finance: Get Credit Moving Again

The challenge for the new Administration: Revive the credit markets and keep a light touch with regulation

Health Care: Turning to Info Tech for a Remedy

For business, real health-care reform means lowering the cost of care, which comes to 16% of U.S. GDP and keeps going up

Trade: Renew the Drive to Open Markets

From opening markets to enforcing standards, business wants trade to be a top priority for the next Administration

Labor: A Proposed Law Could Swell Union Ranks

Business plans to actively resist the proposed Employee Free Choice Act, legislation that changes the way unions organize workers

Infrastructure: Early Action to Fix Things

To keep America competitive, the new Administration must upgrade highways, rail, and ports, along with telecommunications

Technology: Will Washington Lend an Ear?

Tech companies are looking to the Obama Administration for tax, education, immigration, and energy policies that will give them an edge

Immigration: Let Talented Workers In

U.S. companies want freer entry for skilled and unskilled labor, but relaxing the rules won't be a pressing concern for Obama