What Happened At TED.

Posted by: Bruce Nussbaum on February 9, 2009

I didn’t get to TED but Helen Walters, head of the Innovation & Design site did go. I posted recently that I thought more would come out of TED than Davos this year. Why? We have unprecedented gloom about the global economy but policy-makers cannot climb out of their old economic paradigms and solutions to solve the problem. Just look at the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill, which emphasizes old-style tax cuts and cuts money for new-style growth generators such as smart electric grids, wind and solar power, and new classrooms for new learning experiences. TED offers both optimism and new ways of thinking and solving. Here’s TED on Tweet by Helen.

Was there too much optimism at TED this year? Maybe so. Helen says that many in the audience felt that the presentations should have been more closely connected to the immediate financial, economic and political crises facing all of us. Most of the talks focused on longer-term issues such as water, global warming and the oceans.

Chris Anderson thinks otherwise. Here is his quote: “”This nightmare will pass away in the morning, the resources of nature and men’s devices are just as fertile and productive as they were.”

I share TED’s glorious optimism, it’s cuting-edge perspectives, its collaborative open source approach and its great people.

I also believe that we are approaching a serious depression that could have enormous consequences for the planet. Our economic problems may or may not pass quickly, depending on how politicians think and what they do.

Check out TED.

Reader Comments

John Bancroft

February 9, 2009 5:19 PM

Well if you want to know what's happening at the intersection of renewable eneregy, innnovation/technology and investment & policy, even TED can't compete with GREENTECH MEDIA.

http://www.greentechmedia.com/

Post a comment

 

About

Want to stop talking about innovation and learn how to make it work for you? Bruce Nussbaum takes you deep into the latest thinking about innovation and design with daily scoops, provocative perspectives and case studies. Nussbaum is at the center of a global conversation on the growing discipline of innovation and the deepening field of design thinking. Read him to discover what social networking works—and what doesn’t. Discover where service innovation is going and how experience design is shaping up. Learn which schools are graduating the most creative talent and which consulting firms are the hottest. And get his take on what the smartest companies are doing in the U.S., Asia and Europe, far ahead of the pack.

BW Mall - Sponsored Links

Buy a link now!